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Full text of "Chiaroscuro"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/chiaroscuro11907seni 



. 



THE CHIAROSCURO 

VOLUME I 



k A k 




Published by the SENIOR CLASS of the 
ALABAMA GIRLS' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



DEDICATION 

CJ To Dr. Francis M. Peterson, our honored and beloved president, 
who by precept and example so wisely and nobly points us to 
duty, immortal love and God, we affectionately dedicate this 
little volume " Chiaroscuro." 2 5 5. 2 2 2 2 




THE PREFACE 



SINCE this little volume is edited for the purpose of pleasing you, kind 
reader, view it not, we beg, with a critic's eye but pass its imperfections 
by. We are confident that you can not fail to comply with our request 
when you know that this is our first venture into print — the very earliest 
attempt of the students of the A. G. I. S. to give to their friends a chapter of 
the life at their dear old Alma Mater. 

If we please all our readers, it is necessar} - for us to include in our book 
"something to amuse you, something to make you sad, something to make you 
sentimental, something to make you laugh, something to make you weep, and 
something to make you think." 

Although we tried to keep up a buoyant faith in our undertaking, without 
the inspiration and aid of our friends among the faculty, officers and girls, it is 
possible that it might have failed. We are especially indebted to our acting 
President for his interest manifested in a most practical way. We also owe our 
English teacher "a personal debt for unfailing kindness and encouragement 
which can only be acknowledged, never repaid." Nor can we forget the help 
and sympathetic interest of the Faculty Committee on School Publications. 



Editorial Staff of the "Chiaroscuro" 

BRICE MILLER Editor-in-Chief 

BESSIE GORDON I 

\ • • Associate Editors 

NEALIE NETTLES) 

MARY McCORD Business Manager 

ALBERTA SCRUGGS Assistant Business Manager 

SARA DALE Advertising Manager 

NELL CLEVELAND . . . Artist 

ALMA ROBINSON Club Editor 

ETTIE MAE HATCHER Class Editor 

CORA ALLISON Typewriter 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Title Page 1 

Dedication 3 

Preface 5 

Editorial Staff 7 

Trustees 11 

Names of Faculty and Officers 15 

Faculty and Officers by Contraries 19 

Graduate Students 22 

Senior Class Roll 24 

History of Senior Class 25 

A Tale of the Class 27 

Junior Class Roll 31 

Junior Poem 33 

Sophomore Roll 35 

Sophomore History 36 



PAGE 

Freshman Roll 39 

Preparatory Roll 41 

Explanatory Statement 42 

Song o' the Subs 43 

Senior Prophecy 45 

Senior Preferences 49 

A Chapel Exercise 51 

Outline of "Julius C;tsar" 54 

How to Stand in with the Faculty 60 

Description of Murillo's "Mother and Child". . . . 61 
How Shakespeare Has Revealed Character in "Mac- 
beth" 65 

The Love of Lady Macbeth for Macbeth Contrasted 

with that of Nancy Lammeter for Godfrey Cass . 68 
Character Sketch of Silas Marner 69 



PAGE 
Silas Marner's Cottage on the Night of Dunstan 

Cass's Visit 71 

Quotations 72 

John's Favorite Story 73 

Wanted, Not Wanted 75 

"Inasmuch as Ye Have Done It unto One of the Least 

of These Little Ones" 76 

What Did Christmas Bring ? 78 

Grinds 80 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 85 

Alpha Club 87 

Castalian Literary Society 89 

Julia Strud wick Tutwiler Club 91 

Emma Hart Willard Club 93 



PAGE 

Schumann Society 95 

St. Cecilia Club 97 

Art Club 98 

"Kandy Kooking Klub" . . 99 

School Girl Maxims. 100 

B. B. B. T 103 

C. A. T 105 

J. A. C 107 

Tennis Club 109 

Professionals 110 

The Will Ill 

The Senior Farewell 113 

Ads 115 




"Board of Trustees 



His Excellency, BRAXTON BRAGG COMER .... President Ex Officio 

HARRY C. GUXXELLS Superintendent of Education .... Ex Officio 

HOX. S. H. D. MALLORY State At Large Selma 

HON. VIRGIL BOULDIN State At Large Scottsboro 

JUDGE H. AUSTILL First District Mobile 

HOX. SOL. D. BLOCH Second District Camden 

JUDGE A. H. ALSTOX Third District Clayton 

REY. J. T. MANGUM Fourth District Tallassee 

M. A. GRAHAM Fifth District Prattyille 

W. E. W. YERBY Sinth District Greensboro 

W. W. HARALSON" Seyenth District Fort Payne 

J. C. KUMPE Eighth District Moulton 

COL. SAMUEL WILL JOHX Xinth District Birmingham 



Trustees 




Braxton Bragg Comer, son of John Fletcher and Catherine Drewery 
Comer, born Nov. 7, 1848, in Barbour, County. Received early education in 
the best common schools in Barbour County. Was a student at the Univer- 
sity when it was captured and burned by the Federal soldiers. Studied one 
year in University of Georgia. Graduated with honors from Emory and 
Henry College, Virginia, in 1872. Married Miss Eva Harris of Georgia. 
Has had the offices of President of First National Bank, Birmingham, of 
Avondale Cotton Mills, Alabama Railroad Commission. Was inaugurated 
Governor of State of Alabama 1907. Governor Comer has proved himself 
the friend of education. He is known throughout the country as the 
"School Governor." On March the fourth he signed House Bill 4P7. the 
A. G. I. S. Appropriation Bill. 



Harry C. Gunnels, son of Daniel R. and Susan Cunningham Gunnels, 
born at Oxford, Alabama, October, 1868. Received early education at Ox- 
ford Alabama; college education at Oxford College and Vanderbilt University, 
and professional education at the University of Alabama. Held position as 
Co-principal of Ashland High School, Professor of Science at Oxford College, 
principal of Boys' High School at Anniston, Alabama, Superintendent of 
Anniston Public Schools, civil officer, member of the House of Representatives 
in 1900 and 1901 from Calhoun County, chief clerk of Department of Educa- 
tion in 1898-1902, and again in 1903-1907. Married Sadie Goss from Com- 
merce, Georgia. 




Trustees 




Samuel Will John, son of Joseph Reed and Rosa Jane Smith John, 
born 1845 at Uniontown, Alabama. Attended school at the University of 
Alabama. Read law under his father. Practiced law in Dallas County. 
Represented Dallas County twice, and Jefferson County twice in the Legis- 
lature. Held office of Colonel in War between the States. Author of many 
laws, the most important of which are: First Child Labor Law in Alabama; 
Establishment of Experiment Station at Auburn; Act to establish a Juvenile 
Court; Bills to Increase the Appropriation for the Alabama Girls' Industrial 
School. Is Trustee of Alabama Insane Hospital, of Department of Archives 
and History, and of the Alabama Girls' Industrial School since June, 1899' 
Married Susan E. Woolsey in 1870; Estelle Thornton Carson, 1874; Rosa M. 
Clisby, 1887. 



Malcolm A. Graham, son of Malcolm Daniel and Amelia Ready Gra- 
ham. Born 1859, at Henderson, Texas. Educated at private schools in 
Montgomery, and at the LTuiversity. Prominent cotton manufacturer and 
banker at Prattville. Was a councilman of his town for fourteen }-ears, and 
a member of the Board of Revenue of Autauga County. Married Ellen 
Leonora McWilliams in 1882. Trustee of Alabama Girls' Industrial School. 





Trustees 



Augustus H. Alston, born in Georgia, 
moved to Alabama after the war between the 
States. Enlisted in 9th Tennessee Cavalry under 
JohnH. Moigan. Was for two months a prisoner 
of war at Rock Island, 111. After the War between 
the States was admitted to the bar. Was probate 
judge of Barbour County for two terms. Was 
once a member of County and State Democratic 
Executive Committee. Married Anna M. Ott. 
Is the first Supernumerary Judge of the State 
of Alabama. Was appointed trustee of the 
Alabama Girls' Industrial School by Governor 
Oates. 



AUGUSTUS H. ALSTON" 

Solomon D. BLOCH, son of Daniel W. 
and Jannetta Kahn Bloch. Born at Camden, 
Alabama, January 16, 1855. Educated at 
common schools. Studied law under Col. 
R. H. Dawson, of Camden, but did not make 
law his profession. Twice mayor and once 
alderman of his native town. Has held 
many high positions in the Masonic lodge 
and is a member of the order of Knights of 
Pythias. Was once a member of both 
County and State Democratic Executive 
Committees. While member of Alabama 
Senate of 1S92, he prepared and introduced 
the bill to establish the Alabama Girls' In- 
dustrial School. Has held the office of 
Trustee of this school since its establishment. 





MiI.OMliX I). BL<>CH 



WILLIAM E. W. YERBY 



William E. W. Yerby, born and 
reared at Greensboro, Alabama. Edu- 
cated in public school and at the Southern 
University at Greensboro. Editor and 
proprietor of The Greensboro Watchman. 
Is licensed attorney, member of Masonic 
order and of the Knights of Pythias. 
Has been Councilman, Mayor and City 
Attorney of his native town. Is Chair- 
man of both County Democratic Com- 
mittee and Senatorial Executive Com- 
mittee. Was President of Alabama Press 
Association 1901-03. Was appointed 
Trustee of Alabama Girls' Industrial 
School in 1907. 



We are very sorry, indeed, that it is impossible for us to present the picture and the history of every member of the Board of Trustees. 



13 







^^ LJ J—TJ- V 






o rr'«c 



Faculty 

Rev. Francis M. Peterson, D. D., L. I.. D President 

Mr. James Alexander Moore, M. S President pro tempore 

Mrs. Mary Morrison Babb Lady Principal 

Psychology and Education— MISS ELIZABETH MAUDE HALEY, B. S. 

Engush— MISS SOPHIA FITTS 
MISS MARY YOUNG, A. B. 

MaThematics-MISS MARY GOODE STALLWORTH 
MISS RUBY LAWHON, M. S. 

History— MISS ANNE KENNEDY 

Natural Science— MRS. MARY MORRISON BABB 

Botany— MISS MINNA GROTE 

Physiology -MISS LYDIA OVERALL 

Latin— MISS SALLIE HARDAWAY 

Physical Education— MISS LYDIA OVERALL 

Music— MISS EDNA BUSH, Director 



16 



Piano— MISS ELEANOR CARR 

MISS MARGARET E. BOARDMAN 

MISS BESSIE McCARY 

MISS MAUDE ALLEN 

MISS ANNE G. MOORE 

MISS PEARLEE WILSON 

Stringed Instruments— MISS ELEANOR CARR 

Art- MISS M. S. PINKSTON 

Reading and Oratory— MISS MAUDE HAYES 

Telegraphy-MRS. FLORENCE Y. HUDSON 

Bookkeeping— MR. JAMES ALEXANDER MOORE 

Stenography and Typewriting— MISS ETHEL McMATH 

Dressmaking-MISS ELIZABETH BURKE 

MISS LEO SANDERS 

MRS. MAGGIE CHILSON 

Millinery -MISS SARAH CONNOLLY 

MISS ADRA LALLIE TICE 

Domestic Science— MISS VETA FRANKLIN 

Preparatory Department — MISS LILA McMAHON, A. M. 

MISS MINNA GROTE 

Officers 

Physician D. L. WILKINSON, M. D. 

Trained Nurse— MISS MARY D. HENDERSON 

Secretary— MISS OUINNTILLA HENRY 

Stenographer— MISS ELIZABETH HOUSTON WINSTON 

Librarian— MISS ANNE KENNEDY 

Assistant Librarian-MISS PEARL JOHNSON 

Matron— MISS LAURA McALPINE 

Steward— MRS. S. C. HARRIS 

Electrician— MR. W. M. JONES-WILLIAMS 



17 




Faculty and Officers by 
Contraries. 



President Pro Tem— MRS. FLORENCE Y. HUDSON 

Lady Principal— MISS ANNE G. MOORE 
Physchology and Education— MISS LYDIA OVERALL 



English— MISS MAUDE ALLEN 
MISS LEO SANDERS 

Mathematics— MISS LAURA McALPINE 
MISS VETA FRANKLIN 

HISTORY--MISS SARAH CONNOLLY 

Natural Science— MISS ANNE G. MOORE 



Botany— MISS BESSIE McCARV 

Physiology— MISS MARY GOODE STALL-WORTH 

Latin— MRS. S. C. HARRIS 

Physical Training-MISS MARY GOODE STALLWORTH 

Preparatory Department- MISS EDNA BUSH 
MISS MARGARET E. BOARDMAN 

Music— DR. DAVID LEONIDAS WILKINSON, Director 

MISS ELIZABETH BURKE, Stringed Instruments 

MRS. MARY MORRISON BABB, Voice 

MISS ETHEL McMATH, Piano 

MISS ELIZABETH BURKE, Piano 

MISS MINNA GROTE, Piano 

MISS RUBY LA WHAN, Piano 

Art— MISS QUINTELLA HENRY 

R hading and Oratory— MISS M. S. PINKSTON 

Telegraphy— MISS LILA McMAHON 

Bookkeeping— MISS PEARLEE WILSON 

Scientific Cooking— MISS SOPHIA FITTS 

Stenography and Typewriting— MRS. MAGGIE CHILSON 

Physician— MISS ELEANOR CARR 

Trained Nurse— MISS ANNIE KENNEDY 

Secretary— MISS PEARLEE WILSON 

Stenographer— MISS MARY D. HENDERSON 

Librarian— MISS LYDIA OVERALL 

Matron— MISS MAUDE HAYES 

Steward— MISS sallie hardaway 

Electrician— MISS ADRA LALLIE tice 



19 



POST 





% ---"°' Cv 



Graduate Students 



Colors Gold and White 

FLoiver Freesia 

Motto "Cape Diem" 

PEARL JOHNSON President 

LUCIE LENOIR . . . Secy, and Treas. 

MARY PETERS Poet and Historian 



Lucie Elizabeth Lenoir 

"And truly, is there such a spell 

As those three letters. "L. E. L ,' 
To 'witch a world with song?" 



Mary Teters 

"To see her is to love her. 
And love but her forever; 

For nature made her what she is, 
And ne'er made sic anitber!" 



Tear/ Johnson 

"Our fairest Pearl, dids't thou ne'er dream 
How near thy name and thou are one, 

Of all the fancies bright that seem 
Round it and thee to softly beam, 

And through its meaning run ? " 




Senior Class 



Motto 



"Excelsior" 

Flower Sweet Pea 

Coloi s Crimson and Black 



Officers 



BKICE .MILLER President 

ALBERTA SCRUGGS Vice-President 

NEALIE NETTLES Secy, and Treas. 

BESSIE GORDON Historian 

NELL CLEVELAND Poet 

MARY McCORD PROPHET 

SARA DALE Musician 

ALMA ROBINSON Herald 



Class Roll 



Allison, Cora 

Cleveland, Nell 
Dale, Sara 

Gordon, Bessie 

Hatcher, Ettie Mae 



McCord, Mary 
Miller, Brick 

Nettles, Nealie 
Robinson, Alma 

Scruggs, Alberta 




Cora Allison 



' ' There is none like her, none ' ' 



Member of the Julif 



Strudwick Tutwiler Club; Treas 
Typewriter for the " Ch 



r of the Cap-a-pie Stenography Club 
•scuro." 



The March winds brought Miss Allison to Piedmont, Alabama, where she 
has lived ever since. The first four years of her school life were spent under 
the tutelage of her mother. She then attended the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Seminary of Piedmont: her life in this school ended when she came to Montevallo, 
where she remained only one session. She was out of school for a year and a 
half, and in January of the second year at home, she became a pupil of the 
Frances E. Willard Public School. After two years she received a certificate 
from this school. In 1904, she returned to the A. G. I. S., and entered the 
Sophomore Class. Her willing hands are always extended to give help to a 
fellow student. 



Nell Wood C le\eland 

" Through light and shadow thou dost range, 
Sudden glances, sweet and strange , 
Delicious spites and darling anger. 
And any forms of flitting change." 

Active member of the Y. W. C. A.; Treasurer of the Castalian Literary Society; President of 
the Castalian Literary Society for two years; Secretary of the Schumann Society; Presi- 
dent of the Schumann Society; Poet of the Senior Class; Designer for the "Chiaroscuro." 

Centreville, Alabama, was a place of rejoicing when Miss Cleveland, with 
her poetic nature, first entered the home of her parents. She learned her "A B 
C's" in the public school of her native city; here all of her preparatory school 
days were spent. In September of 1903, she came to Montevallo, and entered 
the Sophomore Class. She is the great mathematician of the Class, and we 
would hope for her some success in the scientific world, if it were not for a very 
serious " heart trouble " with which she is affected. 




Sara Barnette Dale 



i ., . 




f*% . ■ • ' 




' 'Beauteous rosebud, young and gay, 
Blooming in thy early May, 
Never mays' t thou, lovely flower, 
Chilly shrink, in sleety show' r. ' ' 



:mber of the Y. W. C. A.; Critic of the St. Cecili; 
cilia Club; Secretary of ihe Tutwiler Club; Musicia 
Classes; Advertisiug Manager of the "Chiaroscuro." 



Club; Vice-President of the 
i of both the Junior and 



One eventful May inorning Oak Hill, Alabama, welcomed another bright 
flower, little Sara Dale. The honor of first awakening this mind to intellectual 
life is claimed by the Oak Hill High School. Her name remained on this 
school roll until '05, when she came to Montevallo equipped to enter the Junior 
Class. Her life at the A. G. I. S. has been marked by earnest work in all 
departments of school duties. The class of '07 is blessed in having such a 
talented musician. Her few leisure moments are rendered more pleasant by 
the perfume of carnations which are the result of Cupid's magical work. Miss 
Dale is a young woman of fine character and of marked devotion to duty. 



"Bessie May Gordon 

' ' Tliat it should come to this ! ' ' 

Member of the Y. W. C. A.; member of the Tutwiler Club; Historian of the Cap-a-pie Ste- 
nography Club; Historian of Ihe Schumann Society; Historian of the Senior Class; Asso- 
ciate Editor of the "Chiaroscuro." 

Bessie Gordon was born in Eutaw, Alabama, in the month of November. 
All of her preparatory school days were spent in the Eutaw High School. 
After she received a certificate from this institution, she came to Montevallo, 
fitted to enter the Junior Class. 




-I 




Ettie Mae Hatcher 



' ' How doth the little busy bee 
Improve each shining hour." 



Member of the Y. W. C. A.; Me 



f the Tutv 
Manager for the ' 



Df the Alpha Club; Clas 



Miss Hatcher entered this mundane sphere amid the gentle breezes of 
April. She first beheld this beautiful world in Hartford, Alabama. Her early 
knowledge was gained in the public schools of Geneva County. She afterwards 
attended the Newton High School. Her school days in Montevallo began when 
she entered the Freshman Class. Miss Hatcher is interested in all forms of re- 
ligion, and we predict for her a large circle of friends and a wide influence 
wherever her lot may be cast. 



Man Lewis McCord 



' 7 never saw a fairer 
I never lo'ed a dearer. 



. W. C. A.; Vice-President of the Tutwiler Club; in both h 
*. Prophet of her class; Business Manager of the " Ch 



An addition to the pleasures of the celebrations of the May festivities was 
the appearance of Miss McCord. Her gray matter was first cultivated at the 
Goodwater High School of her native village, Goodwater, Alabama. In 1905 
she entered the Sophomore Class, and ever since that time she has been a 
regular attendant of the A. G. I. S. When she came to Montevallo, she had 
acquired the art of making " A " in English, and she has never departed from 
her early training. She will receive her certificate in Scientific Cooking this 
year. We wonder why this particular branch of work is especially interesting 
to her. Quiet and retired in disposition, gentle and courteous in manner, con- 
scientious in work, she is one of the most lovable of our class. 




i 



25 




of the Y W. C. A.; 
ent of the Jun 
of the " Chiaroscuro." 



' Club; Pr 



Annie Brice Miller 

And that smile , like sunshine, dart 
Into many a sunless heart. 
For a smile of God thou art. ' ' 

Secretary of the St. Cecilia Clu 



iident of the Sen 



To Camden, Alabama, the class of '07 is indebted for Miss Miller, its loyal 
President. With the primrose she came to brighten the home of her parents, 
and we are certain that she has never forgotten that her life is to harmon ze 
with this flower. Her first school days were spent ill the public school of her 
native village. Here she remained until she entered the ninth grade of the 
Chester (S. C.) Graded School. The next year she returned to Camden, where 
she remained out of school a session. In 1904, she made a wise decision and 
maxticulated in the A. G. I. S. When she came, she shared the "abundant 
wisdom" of the Sophomore Class Seeing three long years before her final 
destination, she diligently began her journey, and now in the third year of 
earnest work, she distinctly sees that which will tell her that her school days 
at Moutevallo are ended. She was a representative to the Students' Volunteer 
Movement at Nashville in '06. The quietude of her school life here is disturbed 
by the chemistry experiments which are peculiarly exciting to her. With her 
shy and winsome manner 
she has won her way to the 
affections of every class- 
mate, and we are certain 
that she will have many 
friends after leaving these 
walls. 



Nea/ie Hastletine Nettles 

' ' Sweet lips whereon perpetuahty did reign 
The summer calm of charity." 
Corresponding Secretary of the Y. W. C. A.; active member of the Tutwiler Club; Vice-Pres- 
ident of the Alpha Club; Secretary and Treasurer of the Junior Class, and of the Senior 
Class; Associate Editor of the " Chiaroscuro.'' 

When the gentle breezes of a warm June day were blowing Miss Nettles 
came to Beuna Vista, Alabama. To the public school of Beuna Vista must be 
given the honor of storing the first knowledge in her cranium. When she left 
this school, she spent one session in a school of Natchez, Alabama; then she 
entered the Sophomore Class of the A. G. I. S. After spending one year and a 
half here, she showed her ability by teaching a session near her home. She re- 
turned to school and entered the Junior Class of '06. She was a representative 
to the Students' Volunteer Movement at Nashville in '06, and to the Gulf States' 
Convention at Montgomery in '07 As the branches of the wild rose spread in 
every direction, so her knowledge touches many subjects, but it centres in 
Edu ation. She will receive her full Diploma this year. Her career in school 
has been marked by native ability and studious habits; and we not only hope, 
hut we expect, a large measure of success to be hers after she leaves school. 




26 



Alma Bertie Robinson 




"Her voice was ever soft. 

Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman. 

Member of the Y. \V. C. A ; Member of the Castalian Uterarv Society; Herald of the Senior 
Class; Club Manager of the " Chiaros'curo." 

Miss Robinson entered this "vale of tears " among the chrysanthemums of 
Alexander City, Alabama. The child's early instinct to talk soon died, and 
since that time her proficiency in English has been of a silent order. She first 
attended the Alexander City Graded High School, where she remained until 
she finished the eight grade. Then she went one year to a private school of 
Alexander City, and then completed the work of the tenth grade in the Alex- 
ander City Graded High School. The next year she joined the Sophomores of 
the A. G. I. S., and ever since then she has been seen within its walls. She 
was a representative to the Gulf States' Convention at Montgomery in '07. 
Although not gifted with the fluency of an orator, she possesses a sweet dispo- 
sition and the art of making friends. 



' 

1 



Alberta Eliza Scruggs 

' 'A heart as soft, a heart as kind, 

A heart as sound and fret 

As in the whole world thou cans' t find." 

Active member of the Y. W. C. A.; Critic of the St. Cecilia Club; President of the St. Cecilia 
Club; Treasurer of the Castalian Literary Society; Vice-President of the Senior Class; As- 
sistant Business Manager of the " Chiaroscuro." 

Amid the swaying golden rod in the quiet village of West Bend. Alabama. 
Miss Scruggs commenced her earthly sojourn. Her early education was ob- 
tained at a private school of Atlanta, Georgia, where she remained one session. 
She returned to West Bend, and attended the public school of that place until 
she came to Montevallo in 1 902. She entered the Freshman Class, and has 
been connected with the A. G. I. S. ever since then. Being in frail health in 
'04, she wisely decided to spend three years in the Junior and Senior (.Masses. 
She was a representative to the Gulf States' Convention at Montgomery in '07. 
Her lovable disposition, expressed so plainly in her sweet face, has won so 
many friends that we are not able to find one enemy for her in all the student 
bodv. 




N 



27 



A Tale of the Class 

Ten little Seniors, all in a line, 

One got married, then there were nine; 

Nine little Seniors in the same state, 

One moved out West, then there were eight; 

Eight little Seniors loving Jevon(s) 

One got to hating him, then there were seven; 

Seven little Seniors, all were called bricks, 

One joined a mason, leaving but six; 

Six little Seniors truly alive, 

One sailed away, then there were five; 

Five little Seniors, sound at the core, 

One got hearts-ease, then there were four; 

Four little Seniors gay and heart free, 

One was caught, then there were three; 

Three little Seniors made up the crew, 

One jumped overboard, then there were two; 

Two little Seniors of the line the end, 

The standard of the class truly defend. 



28 



Junior Class 

Flower White Pink. 
Watchword — "Alio." 
Colors— White and Green 

Florence Patterson, 
president 

Eunora Farris, 
vice-pres. 

Lilian McVay, 
secretary-treasurer 

Mattie Estelle Garner, 
critic 

Lula Edens, 
historian- 
Willie Jenkins, 

POET 

Minnie Beech, 
prophet 




Bentley, Mattie 
Bullock, Elizabeth 
Dawson, Georgia 
Deer, Ella 
Dunlap, Daisy 
Farris, Eunora 
Garrett, Beulah 
Garner, Mattie Estellk 
Haggard, Jamie 
Jones, Vesta 
Massey, Ella 
McRee, Ida 
Patton, Eola 
Posey, Lockie 
Reynolds, Lucie 
Rosson, Fannie 
Seibold, Lyua 
Shipp, Della 
Vaughn, Elizabeth 
Waldrop, Genie 
Wilson, Mabel 



31 



Junior Class Poem 

The White Pink 



Of all the flowers that ever bloomed, 
Which one is fairest? Think! 

As Juniors of A. G. I. S. 

We say the sweet white pink. 

Its petals small, a myriad throng, 
To count's a task complete. 

A task well done which leaves behind 
A memory fresh and sweet. 



White is the type of purity, 

Pure women may we be, 
Who will not fail to fight for good 

On life's broad boundless sea. 

The green of stems and dainty leaves 

A sign of strength alway. 
Pure thoughts bring light to darkened earth 

But strength must make it stay. 



And so this little flower we choose; 

An emblem pure and strong, 
To cheer us on to do our best. 

And keep the world from wrong. 




32 




Sophomore Class 



Flower Marechai NlEL Rose 

Colors Green and Gold 

Motto "To the Higher through the Hard" 

Officers 

ELLEN DAVIS President 

EMMA LONG Vice-Presidet 

NANNIE DAVIS Secretary 

KATHLEEN JONES Historian 

MYRA WILLIAMS Prophet 

MAGGIE SANFORD Poet 

HYACINTH HAYNIE Critic 



Agee, Prudie 

Bullock, Cate 
Bass, Cecil 

Barge, Edna 

Bagley, Othella 
Bowen, U. B. 
Baker, Lillian 

Brown, Juliette 
Corley, Bertha 
Chapman, MeTa 

Carnathan, Helen 
Crawford, Annie 
Davis, Ellen 

Davis, Nannie 
Gray, Mable 

Gardner, Ella May 
Griffin, Olivia 
Glenn, Rubye 



Class c Roll 

Gay, Eunice 

Hall, Corrie 
Head, Jessie 

Hudgens, Jewell 
Houser, Ethel 
Haynie, Hycie 
Jones, Mabel Louise 
Jones, Kathleen 

KlLLINGWORTH, MAUD 

Lea, Ren a 

Lawrence, JaTie 
Lindsey, Alice 
Long, Emma 

Macom, Bertha 

Meroney, Mamie 
Mimms, Clara 

McClurkin, Lillie 

Palmer, Thomastine 
Purifoy, Clyde 



Pierce, Minnie 

Roouemore, May 
Robinson, Susie 

Sanders, Claude 
Smith, Ione 

Sellers, Sallie 
Sellers, May 

Smith, Winnie D. 
Sanford, Maggie 

Tidmore, Kathleen 
Traylor, Anna May 
Windham, Helen 
Walker, Ella 

Williams, Myra 

Whisenhunt, Carrie 
Wise, Fay 

Wood, May 
York, Cona 



35 




The class of 1909 was organized in November, 
1905, as a body of about ninety Freshmen. The of- 
ficers chosen were, Ellen Davis, President: Bessie 
Shirley, Vice President, and Elizabeth Pratt. Sec- 
retary and Treasurer. We chose as our colors yel- 
low and green, and as our Flower, the Marechal 
Niel Rose. Our motto is: "To the higher, through 
the hard." 

As we were inexperienced in this work, we did 
nothing worthy of note during the first two terms. 

The entertainment given us by the Young Wo- 



men's Christian Association, however, will always 
be remembered, for it brought us more closely in 
touch with one another. 

A great deal of interest was taken in the Class 
Day exercises of Alay 13, 1906. In the Assembly 
Hall we formed in line, and with our Standard 
Bearer leading, we marched to the Chapel singing 
<>ur class song as we went. After reaching the 
Chapel all the classes stood until the Seniors had 
taken their places on the rostrum. The President 
of our class replied to the speech made by the Pres- 
ident of the Senior Class. Then we sang our stanza 
in the general class song, after which all the other 
classes sang in turn. 

When the session was over we returned to our 
various homes happy ; yet with all this happiness 
there was mingled a feeling of sadness. 

After a vacation of three and one half months, 
we came back to school not as Freshmen, but as 
ambitious Sophomores. 



36 



'Tis true that some of our class were missing ; 
nevertheless, their places were filled by a number 
of new students whose names were soon added to 
our list, and officers for ic)o6-'o7 were elected. Ellen 
Davis was re-elected President; Emma Long was 
elected Vice-President; Nannie Davis Secretary and 
Treasurer ; Myra Williams, Prophet ; Hycie Haynie, 
Critic ; Maggie Sanford, Poet ; Ella Maye Gardner, 
Musician. 



There are now about sixty regular members 
enn died in the class. 

This year we hope to work in such a way that 
next year we shall not merely be called Juniors, but 
that we shall be worthy of that name. And ven- 
turing' still further into the shadowy future, we 
trust that when we shall have finished three vears 
of A. G. I. S. work, we shall enter the fourth year 
with a determination to make the twelfth graduat- 
ing class the largest and strongest in the record of 
the school. 




37 




Freshman Class 



Colors Purple and White 



Flower Violet 



■ Non Nobis Solum ' 



Officers 

DONNELL E. LINDSEY, President MAUD SKELTON, Secretary and Treasurer 

MARY HARRISON, Vice-President JOSEPHINE HURST, Poet LILLIE ATKINSON, Historian 

LAURA JOHNSON, Critic VIRGINIA HALL, Musician 

Roll 



Abney, Nell 
Allen, Louada 
Atkinson, Lillie 
Bush, Anna 
Crocket, Clara 
Cocciola, Bianca 
Collins, Dana 
Collins, Nellie 
Cross, Lora 
Crump, Linola 
Darden, Anna Bell 
Dayies, Ashley 



Deer, Frankie 
Dowling, Bertie Mae 
Enis, Clancy 
Faulk, Leola 
Grady, Martha 
Griswold, Lola 
Hall, Virginia 
Henry, Addie 
Harrison, Mary 
Haynes, Charlsie 
Hurst, Tosephine 



Harmon, Lillie 
Johnson, Laura 
Jones, Alieen 
Landgrafe, Ethel 
Landgraff, Alma 
Lindsey, Ruth 
lindsey, donnell 
Long, Jessie 
Long, Maud 
Lyman, Laura 
Lyon, Marguerite 



McNeal, Hunter 
Morrison, Johnnie 
Morgan, Mary 
Morrison, Irene 
Myers, Mabel 
Neill, Mattie 
Oates, Elma 
Page, Jessie 
Poole, Annie 
Peterson, Mary 
Peters, Ella 



Rhodes, Effie 
Rush, Anner 
Sanders, Helen 
Skelton, Maud 
Sims, Laura 
Smith, Alma 
Smith, Lilla 
Taylor, Mamie 
Tapscott, Mary 
Thomas, Louise 
Thompson, Edna 
Walker, Nonie 



39 



Barefield, Ethei. 
Bealle, Jennie 
Berry, Emma 

Boring, Maude 
Cain, Annie 

Chandler, Louise 
Clayton, Mamie 
Comer, Margie 
Cross, Vivian 
Davis, Lula 

DeBardelaben, Pearl 
Dixon, Nellie May 
Dobbs, Edna 

Dorroh, Lacy 

Eddings, Geneva 
Eddings, Lillie 
Ezell, Mamie 

Frazer, Annie Clay 
Halfman, Hattie Lou 
Hall, Eleanor 

Hamilton, Emma 

Henderson, Pearl 
Hodges, Sallie 
Holley, Addie 



Preparatories 

Holley, Ruby 
Hooker, Nena 
Hudson, Maud 

Izlar, Glennie 
Jones, Eva V. 
Jones, Leola 
Kelly', Gertrude 
Kroell, Georgia 
Lambert, Amelia 
Land, Lula 

Lamkin, Clara 
Latham, Irene 
Lindsay, Mary Belle 
Livingston, Bessie 
Ly-le, Essie 

McRaE, Inez 

Meroney, Mildred 
Moorer, Zula 
Morrison, Lola 
Newton, Etta 
Nix, Lola 

Page, Etta 

Pelham, Mary Clyde 
Perkins, a. M. E. 
Williams, Georgia 
Williams, Gussie 
Williams, Jean 

Williams, Jennie 
Wimberly, Ethel 
Young, Ruby 



Poole, Mittie 

Preddy, Mary 
Pluett, Mary 
Reed, Gladys 

Rikard, Maggie 

Roberts, Venia Ola 
Robinson, Willie 
Seay', Annie 

Sanders, Rhoda 
Sanders, Canna 
Scruggs, Jennie 
Seale, Lavada 
Sirmon, Sallie 
Smith, Beedie 

Thaxton, Lillie 
Thomas, Flora 
Tisdale, Autie 

Tompkins, Lula 
Treadwell, Pearl 
Trucks, Clara 
Walker, Lucy 
Watson, Lula 

Waters, Mabel Endora 
Whitley, Lelia 



4' 



For reasons '"Wise ar\d otherwise," 
there are soti(e students wh.o are not 
represented ir\ tJt\is volume. We Jqope 
tt\at qext year tf\ey may be enrolled 
iri regular classes ar\d tl\us receive all 
due horior. 




42 



Song o' the Subs 



Ursula Deixhamps 



In our Freshman _vear, we had no fear 

But thought we knew it all : 
Ere we were through, we quite well knew 

That pride had had a fall. 
We jumbled things, the queens and kings 

And dates of History; 
To stand the test or sum, es est, 

\\ as then a victory. 

Still we were not so sad. and never very bad. 

Though exams, made us feel a little blue ; 
So all ye Freshmen dear, partake of better cheer. 

For we were quite as verdant once as you. 

We then began, as Sophs, to plan 

What we were going to be. 
Oh ! Xo ! Absurd was not the word. 

So self-important we. 
The Gallic War did much to mar 

The confidence we felt ; 
Likewise the words : Cube-root and surds. 

Infinitive and Celt. 

Oh ! we were happy then, but did not think so, when 
Examinations made us all lament ; 

So Sophomores take heart, and try to do your part. 
For we were once in your predicament. 



As Juniors next, we were quite vexed 

At all we had to do. 
We had to write, till late at night. 

On themes and Ethics, too. 
Hyperbole. Apostrophe, 

Our wear}- brains did tax ; 
Geometry and History 

Would ne'er let us relax. 

But still we had our fun; for when their tasks are 
done. 

All Juniors rest ; indeed this is not strange — 
In nineteen-six, 'twas true, in nineteen-seven. too. 

This rule should stand without a single change. 

Irregulars three, we've decided to be. 

Whom a Graduate-student dubs 
With a little vexation and irritation 

And anger, perhaps, "The Subs." 
So the name we retain, and "Subs" we remain, 

Until this session is o'er; 
With a tear and a sigh, we'll say "Good-bye," 

And our days as "Subs" are no more. 

So with sines and interpolation, we work with but 
little cessation 
With Indirect Discourse and Ablative Abso- 
lutes, too ; 
The treaties of Paris and Ryswick ; Xitric Acid and 
Glacial Phosphoric : 
And now, kind friends, we bid you a fond 
"Adieu." 



43 




PROpHCq 

or the 

CUSS 

or 'on 





Following a voice which seemed to be calling 
me. I was led to the chapel of A. G. I. S. and to a 
seat in the senior row of desks. There was a mys- 
terious looking man on the rostrum, who had set 
up an apparatus fur a moving picture show. He 
was announcing that he would present a series of 
pictures of the class of '07. thirty years hence. 

Ah- gaze is riveted on the passing show. I see 
a club room in which there is an assembly of in- 
terested women. A familiar figure is in the presi- 
dent's chair. I know her — but who is she? Yes, it 
is Brice Miller, the president of the class of '07. I 
think 1 can tell the plans of those noble women, 
and I know that my classmate has determination 
sufficient to do her part, and human kindness 
enough to lend a helping hand to those in need of 
it. The club adjourns, and quickly I am introduced 
to Sara Dale. Yes, she has changed : but in her 



still handsome face, one can see that she is a wo- 
man of thought and much strength of character. 
She is an enthusiastic instructor of music in a well 
known college of the South. As the scene is shift- 
ed, 1 catch a fleeting glimpse of her as she writes to 
Brice, who is still her closest friend and dearest 
assi >ciate. 

In a library whose shelves are crowded with 
dark, well-worn books, the most of which are his- 
tories, I see a pale, sweet faced little woman with 
stooped shoulders seated at the desk. After search- 
ing among the papers on a file, Bessie Gordon, with 
true historic zeal, consults Gibbon, and then begins 
writing the concluding chapter of her Roman his- 
tory. 

Now I am transported to a school in China. 
The room is filled with children who have their 
eager, yellow faces turned toward their teacher who 
is gladly, powerfully relating the parable of the 
ninety and nine sheep. That sympathetic teacher 
is Alma Robinson. Her once dark hair is now gen- 
erously streaked with gray; but it is her face that 
holds one. It tells that she has caught and reflects 
the life of the Une of whom she teaches. 

The scene following brings me back to an Amer- 
ican home. A little woman, with hair still dark and 
eves yet bright, takes her seat in an easy chair by 
the fire. By the dim light. I recognize Nell Cleve- 



46 



land, whose expression has only deepened with 
time. A tall man with a kind, thoughtful face takes 
a volume from the book-case. Nell is not so much 
hampered by household cares that she can not de- 
vote a great deal of her time to poetry ; and that 
brown book is filled with her lyrics. 

Yes, I think this is a kindergarten ; for it is a 
school room in which there are many small children 
engaged in drawing a box. The teacher, a rather 
stout middle-aged woman with a happy, vivid face, 
is Xealie Nettles. The scene changes, and I see 
her with bundles and suit-case calling good-byes to 
a group of saddened school children, as she boards 
a San Francisco train. She is about to realize the 
dream of her youth — to go on a trip around the 
world to see the places about which she has read. 

My attention is now held by the sight of a law- 
yer's office. A hurrying woman — Cora Allison — 
goes to the typewriter. Time has changed her but 
little ; and she seems to have a very systematic, bus- 
iness-like turn of mind; and it is rumored that she 
-knows a great deal about law and that her opinions 
are valued. 

A middle-aged man is in his study faithfully- 
working over his sermon. The door opens and a 
"tiny scrap" of a woman looks in. The minister 
bids her come, and she seats herself by him. Ettie 



May Hatcher's thin gray hair is smoothly combed 
back from her gentle face, which appears to be a 
little careworn. The man leaves off his work, and 
she opens a letter — yes, it is a long letter from 
Howard College; she seems to be almost as much 
interested in that school as in former days. 
"Should old acquaintances be forgot?" 
Pasteboard pyramids, dodecahedrons, icosahe- 
drons, and other polyhedrons loom up before me, 
and a great amount of blackboard space is visible ; 
these tell that this room is headquarters for mathe- 
matics. A tall woman, who is no longer young, is 
seated at her desk. She has a rare charm that gives 
one the impression that she is a teacher of much 
feeling as well as a woman with broad conceptions. 
She sends the whole class to the board, and one 
student has much difficulty with her problem in 
trigonomery. Miss Scruggs, for she is the in- 
structor and the head of the department of mathe- 
matics, makes a suggestion which works, like magic, 
for the problem is soon solved. 

Alberta is gone, and I am breathless with inter- 
est to get the picture of the only remaining member 
of the class. "Machine out of fix, Madam," comes a 
voice from a person whose existence I had forgot- 
ten, and Mary McCord thirty years hence is not re- 
vealed. 



47 



Senior Preferences 



NAM* 


— « 


HERO 


WORK COLOR 


AUT „o„ 


-OT.no. 


«« 


-owl 


R«e««,o N 


CORA 

ALLISON 


After 9:80 
Whistle 


Alexander 
the Great 


Adding 


Amber 


Addison 


"Diligence 
makes more 
lasting acqui- 
sition than 
wisdom." 


Amethyst 


Aster 


Airing 


NELL 

CLEVELAND 


Calling hour 


Cleveland 


Cooking 


Cream 


Coleridge 


"My eyes 
make pic- 
ture s w h e u 
they are 
shut." 


Cameo 


Candy-Tuft 


Climbing 


SARA DALE 


Dawn 


Don Quixote 


Dusting 


Drab 


Dickens 


" When found 
make a note 
of." 


Diamond 


Daisy 


Dancing 


BESSIE 
GORDON 


Gloaming 


Gideon 


Gardening 


Green 


Gibbon 


" He thought 
himself able 
to support his 
lofty preten- 

of reason as 
well as by 
those of pow- 


Garnet 


Geranium 


Golfing 


ETTIE MAY 
HATCHER 


High-no:m 


Hobson 


Housekeeping 


Heliotrope 


Holmes 


" Logic is log- 
ic, that's all I 

say." 


Hydrated 
Silicon 


Hollyhock 


Humming 


MARY 
McCORD 


Midnight 


Melchizedek 


Ministering 


Maroon 


Macau ley 


"Why dost 
thou stay and 
turn away! 
Here lies the 
way to 
Rome." 


Moonstone 


Magnolia 


Maying 


BRICE 
MILLER 


Midday 


Methuselah 


Memorizing 


Mauve 


Milton 


"So buxom, 
blithe and 
debonair." 


Mexican Opal 


Marigold 


Matinee 


NEALIE 
NETTLES 


Noon 


Napoleon 


Needlework 


Nile Green 


Newton 


" To every ac- 
tion there is 
an equal and 
opposite reac- 
tion." 


Nearestone 


Nasturtium 


Napping 


ALMA 
ROBINSON 


Recess 


Roosevelt 


Reading 


Red 


Ruskin 


"Allmywork 
is to help 
tho se who 
have eyes and 
see not." 


Ruby 


Rose 


Rowing 


ALBERTA 
SCRUGGS 


Sunset 


Sidney 


Sweeping 


Scarlet 


Shakespeare 


" But screw 
your courage 
to t h e stick- 
ing place and 
we'll not 
fail." 


Sapphire 


Sweet William 


Sleeping 



49 



1 _ 


1 

1 


* 






■ 




^ 1 

1 

■Kg 




31 




■ r g^ 





8:40 Alex tolls the big bell. 

8:45 Miss Young, Miss Wilson, Miss Carr, 
and Miss Franklin hasten on the platform and begin 
their morning chat. 

8:45 13 Mrs. Babb taps her bell and girls scur- 
ry into place. 

8:46 Miss Bush tips in, settles herself at the 
grand piano, and begins a search in the Gospel 
Hymnal for No. 118. 



8:4(1 -3° Mr. Moore walks in, hangs his derby 
nil the big dictionary and seats himself behind the 
post. 

8:47 Miss Lawhon tips in. jingling the brace- 
lets on her arm. 

8:48 Miss Ilardaway frisks in three feet ahead 
of Miss Grote. 

8:49 Miss Pitts comes and trips it as she goes 
on her light fantastic toe 

8:50 Miss Kennedy rushes in breathlessly ar- 
ranging her hair as she walks. 

8:si Miss Stallworth's class straggles in. 

8:52 "Hezekiah" trots across the stage; the 
Preps giggle. 

80S :3c Miss McMath squeezes in on back 
row, displacing Miss Tice and Miss Sanders. 



5i 



&'-53 : 3° INIiss Overall bounces in. 

8:54 Miss Hayes establishes herself on the 
front seat, toes turned in. 

8:54 130 Miss Haley tips in and sits by Mrs. 
Hudson, admiring her flowers. 

8 :55 Twenty-five faculty members are situated 
on stage with devout attention to the reading of 
the Scriptures. 

8:55:30 Mr. Moore rises and we catch on the 
zephyr a faint whisper. 

8:56 All still. 



8:57 The chords; the girls rise to their feet. 

9:00 Miss Moore's "Amen" lingers to remind 
us of the hymn we have been singing. 

9 :oi Announcements by the President. 

9:01 130 The agony's over : girls get a farewell 
glance at their lessons. 

9:05 Lucie makes a dash for the piano. Teach- 
ers rush lo their various rooms. 

9:06 Chapel's empty ! 




52 




DAMES OF THE fiO'S 




Time — From feast of Lupercalia in February, 44 
B. C, to the battle of Philippi, in the autumn of 42 
B. C. 

Places — Rome, Sardis, and Philippi. 
Theme — 

"But men may construe things after their fashion. 
Clean from the purpose of the things themselves." 

Act I Scene iii. 
Spiritual Theme — 

"Law is universal and inviolable." 

Name — Julius Caesar is stabbed in Act III. hut 
the play is well named, for Caesar's spirit dominates 
the play. 



Exposition 

The exposition is in the first act. It gives the 

personages and surroundings, also the impetus of 

the whole drama. It is illustrated to some extent 

by these qui itations : 

"I lut, indeed, sir. we make holiday to see Caesar, 

and rejoice in his triumph." — Act I Scene i. 

Anti Hi}- — 

" I shall remember ; 

When Caesar says, 'Do this'; it is performed." 

Cassius — 

"Brutus, I do observe you how of late: 
I have not from your eyes that gentleness 
And show of love as I was wont to have: 
You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand 
Over your friend that loves you." — Act I Scene i 

Soothsayer — 

"Beware the ides of March!" — Act I Scene i. 

Brutus — 

"Set honor in one eye, and death i' the other. 
And 1 will look on both indifferently ; 
For let the gods so speed me as I love 
The name of honor more than I fear death." 

Act I Scene ii. 



54 



Cassius — 

"And this man 

Is now become a god ; and Cassius is 

A wretched creature, and must bend his body 

If Caesar carelessly but nod on him." 

Act I Scene i. 

Casca — 

"Ay, marry, was't, and he put it by thrice, every 
time gentler than other ; and at every putting by 
mine honest neighbors shouted." — Act I Scene iii 

Casca — 

"Indeed, they say. the Senators tomorrow 
Mean to establish Caesar as King; 
And he shall wear his crown by sea and land, 
In every place, save here in Italy." 

Act I Scene iii 

Cinna — 

"O, Cassius. if you could 

But win noble Brutus to our party!" 

Act I Scene iii. 

Exciting Force 

The clash of interest begins with the exciting 
force. 



"Ay, do you fear it? 

Then must I think you would not have it so." 

Act I Scene ii. 

Cassius says these words to Brutus just after 
Brutus has said he fears the people will choose 
Caesar for their king. 

"Heightening" of Action 

The "heightening" leads up to the climax. We 
see the beginning of the conspiracy and the plans. 
We see how Brutus is lead into it by his very 
"honor," and how he becomes the life of it. We get 
an idea of the "heightening" by these quotations: 
Cassius — 

"O, you and 1 have heard our fathers sav, 

There was a Brutus once that would havebrook'd 
The eternal devil to keep his state in Rome 

As easily as a king!" Act I Scene ii. 

Brutus to Cassius — 

"That you do love me, I am nothing jealous. 

What you would work me to, I have some aim ; 

How I have thought of this, and of these times. 



55 



I shall recount hereafter; for the present, 

I would not, so with love I might entreat you. 

Be any further mov'd." Act I Scene ii 

Cassius — ■ 

"And why should Caesar be a tyrant, then? 
Poor man ! I know he would not be a wolf. 
But that he sees the Romans are but sheep; 
He were no lion, were not Romans hinds." 

Lucius searching the window for a light. 
"I found 

This paper thus sealed up. and I am sure 
It did not lie there when I went to bed." 

Act II Scene i. 

Brutus — 

"'Speak, strike, redress!' Am I entreated 

To speak and strike? O Rome! I made thee 

promise 
If the redress will follow, thou receivest 
Thy full petition at the hand of Brutus." 

Act II Scene iii. 

Brutus — 

" 'Tis good. Go to the gate ; somebody knocks." 

[Exit Lucius. 
"Since Cassius first did whet me against Caesar 



I have not slept. 

Between the acting of a dreadful thing 

And the first notion, all the interim is 

Like a phantasma or a hideous dream. 

The genius and the mortal instruments 

Are then in council, and the state of man. 

Like a little kingdom, suffers then 

The nature of an insurrection." Act II Scene i. 
Brutus — 

"Let 'em enter — 

They are the faction, ( ) Conspiracy! 

Sham'st thou to show thy dangerous brow by 
night. 

When evils are most free? O, then, by day 

Where wilt thou find a cavern dark enough 

To mask thy monstrous visage? 

For, if thou path, thy native semblance on, 

Not Erebus itself were dim enough 

To hide thee from prevention." Act I Scene i. 
Brutus — 

"They are all welcome." 

Xow, that we are sure that Brutus is a conspira- 
tor, let us watch how the others are led by his de- 
cisions. 



56 



Cassius — 

"I think it is not meet 

Mark Anthony, so well beloved of Caesar, 

Should outlive Caesar. 

Let Anthony and Caesar fall together." 

Act I Scene ii. 
Brutus — 

'"And for Mark Anthony, think not of him, 

For he can do no more than Caesar's arm 

When Caesar's head is off." Act I Scene ii. 

Cassius — 

"But it is doubtful yet 

Whether Caesar will come forth today or no ; 

For he is superstitious grown of late. 

And the persuasions of his angerers 

May hold him from the Capitol today." 

Act II Scene i. 
Cassius — 

"The morning comes upon's, we'll leave you." 
Brutus — 

"And, friends, disperse yourselves, but all re- 
member 

What you have said, and show yourselves true 
Romans." 



Brutus — 

"Let not our looks put on our purposes." 

Act II, Scene i. 
Brutus — 

"Follow me, then." 

In Scene ii Caesar sends a servant to bid the 
priests to sacrifice. The word is sent back for him 
not to stir forth ; for the} - could find no heart in the 
beast. Calpurnia, his wife, had dreamed that she 
saw Caesar's statua. 

Which, like a fountain with a hundred spouts. 

Did run pure blood, and many lust}- Romans 

Came smiling and did bathe their hands in it." 

Act II Scene i. 

She begged Caesar to stay at home. At last, he 
yielded to her plea, and said : 

"Mark Anthony shall say 

I am not well." 

Decius Brutus, a conspirator, came for Caesar. 
He told Caesar that Calpurnia's dream should be 
interpreted in this way: 

"It was a vision fair and fortunate, 

Your statue spouting blood in many pipes, 

In which so many smiling Romans bathed. 



57 



Signifies that from you great Rome shall suck 
Reviving blood, and that great men shall press 
For tinctures, stains, relics, and cognizance." 
Caesar then said he would go forth. 
In Scene iv, Portia sends Lucius to the Capitol 
to bring word of Brutus. We think Brutus must 
have told his plans to his wife. A soothsayer, when 
asked by Portia if he had some suit to Caesar, an- 
swered : 

" 'That I have. lady, if it will please Caesar 
To be so good to Caesar as to hear me 
I shall beseech him to befriend himself." 
In Act III are found the Climax and the Tragic 
Moment. The Climax is where the dramatic forces 
contending for the mastery are most evenly bal- 
anced. In Act III, Caesar enters the Capitol and 
all follow. Artemidorus presses forward with his 
letter, but Caesar refuses to read it. All the others 
crowd around and plea for pardon for Publius Cim- 
ber. Caesar says : 

"I could be well mov'd, if I were as you; 

If I could pray to move, prayers would move me; 

But I am constant as the northern star. 

Of whose time-fixed and restive quality 



There is no fellow in the firmament. 

I was constant Cimber should be banish'd. 

And constant do remain to keep him so." 

Climax 

Brutus pleads for Cimber. Casca stabs Caesar, 
then several others stab him. Lastly, Brutus' sword 
pierces Caesar. Caesar says : "Et tu, Brute? 
Then, fall, Caesar." 

Tragic Moment 

The Tragic moment is suggested by this pas- 
sage : 

"And for Mark Anthony, think not of him; 

For he can do no more than Caesar's arm 

When Caesar's head is off." Act II Scene i. 

The tragic moment is confirmed when Brutus 
allows Mark Anthony: 

"In the pulpit as becomes a friend, 

Speak in the order of his funeral." 

Act III Scene 1. 

The falling action begins when Mark Anthony 
sends his servant to ask the explanation of Caesar's 
death. 



58 



Brutus himself helps to forward the falling ac- 
tion by these words : 

"Good countrymen, let me depart alone. 
And, for my sake, stay here with Anthony : 
Do grace to Caesar's corpse, and grace his speech 
Tending to Caesar's glories, which Mark An- 
thony 
By our permission is allowed to make. 
I do entreat you, not a man depart. 
Save I alone, till Anthony have spoke." 

Act III Scene ii. 

Moment of Final Suspense 

The moment of final suspense is when the for- 
tune presaged by the general nature of the falling 
action seems contradicted, or at least held in sus- 
pense by some unforeseen occurrence. After 
Brutus' speech, we feel that the conspirators have 
triumphed, but the falling action is precipitated by 
Anthony's speech. 

The falling; action continues. Anthony, Octa- 



vius, and Lepidus form the second Triumvirate. 
Brutus and Cassius quarrel. Brutus, through change 
of fortune, becomes a different man. Cassius agrees 
to go to Philippi, though he sees that it is not best. 
They advance to Philippi and engage in battle. 

Catastrophe 

The catastrophe is the final allotment of fortune. 
Cassius thinks the battle is going against the Con- 
spirators, and asks Pindarus to pierce him with the 
sword that helped to kill Caesar. Cassius in dying 
says : 

"Caesar, thou are revenged. 

Even with the sword that killed thee." 
Brutus says : 

"The ghost of Caesar appeared to me 

Two several times by night ; at Sardis once. 

And this last night here in Philippi fields. 

I know my hour is come." Act V Scene v. 

He begs Strato to hold the sword for him. 
Brutus dying, says : 

"Caesar, now be still ; 

I killed not thee with half so srood a will." 



59 



'7/o» to Stand in With the Faculty. 

President Moore — Be in your place the first day after the holidays. 

Mrs. Babb -Smile and say, " Good morning, Mrs. Babb." 

Miss Haley — Bring practical illustrations to class. 

Miss Fitts — Put yourself in your written work. 

Miss Kennedy — Study for culture and not for marks. 

Miss Stall worth— Treat her to a bowl of buttermilk. 

Miss Hardaway — Join her train of attendants. 

Miss Grote — Don't lead her a chase. 

Miss McMahau— Know your S. S. lesson. 

Miss Hays — Keep your distance. 

Miss Bush— 15 # 

Miss Pinkston — Don't be noisy. 

Mrs. Hudson -Send her flowers. 

Miss Connolly — Take her up on the elevator. 

Miss Burke — French fell all seams. 

Miss Overall -Don't talk. 

Miss McMath — Frequently consult the dictionary. 

Miss Moore— Make her laugh. 

Miss Franklin — Talk to her about Montgomery. 

Miss Carr — Stay out of her room. 



60 




Although Murillo's picture "Mother and Child" 
is meant for Christ and His mother, and as such we 
would expect a Jewish woman and boy of the year 
one, yet we can trace in it the influence of the time 
in which the artist lived, his nationality, and, as a 
matter of course, we have in the picture Murillo's 
peculiar method of painting. 

The cry of the Andalusian people in the seven- 
teenth century was for pictures of a religious nature, 
so Murillo painted mostly from subjects taken from 
the Bible, but he used his own people as types. The 
"Mother and Child" is anions' the number of his re- 



ligious pictures, and in it. we have the general out- 
line of an Audalusian mother holding her baby. 

Murillo was a realist by nature, and as such, we 
would have had in his pictures everything given, 
even the minutest detail, and all this without much 
spirit. But his faith transformed him into an ideal- 
ist and in his picture, painted after he had experi- 
enced a deep spiritual feeling, we notice in a greater 
degree the softness and sweetness of his touch along 
with some lack of force and strength. The love of 
detail made Murillo a master of technique, while 
his genuine religious feeling made his pictures ex- 
pressive of high sentiment. 

The effect on Murillo of this outside influence 
and inward transformation, we are made to see and 
feel in his picture, "Mother and Child." 

There is nothing in the background of this pic- 
ture that distracts our attention from the picture 
itself. All is a dead brown with no distinguishing 
object save the bench upon which the Virgin is 
seated. 

A mantle falls loosely and carelessly around the 
skirts of the mother. Her bodice fits neatly about 



61 



the arm and shoulder. The gown is cut low. show- 
ing full shoulders and neck. A scarf hanging down 
in the hack, covers the head except for a small space 
about the face. The Mother holds in her left hand 
a soft, thick cloth that will feel comfortable to the 
tender skin of her hah}'. A sweeping curve from the 
neck and right shoulder ends in the right hand that 
clasps the Child under the left arm. while his little 
arm lies babyishly along her larger one. 

The baby has on no clothing, and half sits, half 
stands, on the capacious lap and arms of the mother. 
He is a robust little baby with a well shaped head, 
a round face, dimpled hands and elbows, plump 
limbs and playful feet. Taken altogether it is the 
form of a chubby, well-rounded little body. 

Both the boy and his mother have the black hair 
and dark eyes characteristic of the Andalusians. He 
has a shock of wavy, thick hair, with three natural 
little waves falling down over his forehead about in 
the shape of the fleur-de-lis. Perhaps it would lie 
straining the matter a little too far to say that these 
three slight curls strengthen the idea of the Trinity- 
embodied in Christ. 



These waves of hair go well with the large, dark, 
serious eyes of the boy. llis eye-brows, although 
slightly curved, are not so arched as those of the 
mother, neither is the look altogether as much one 
of quiet seriousness, yet undoubtedly the eyes of 
both express the silent sympathy and understand- 
ing between the two. There is a slight halo around 
the head of each to indicate to us that the artist is 
conscious of his limitations when it comes to paint- 
ing the Divine Jesus and his saintly mother. 

There is nothing harsh about the picture, no 
abrupt turns, no protruding points. All is softness 
made up of curved lines. 

As we have said before, the event that gives to 
the picture, "Mother and Child," its significance, 
came to pass nearly two thousand years before this 
picture was painted. It was at that far-away date 
that Mary brought forth a son and called his name 
Jesus, the Savior of men. 

We that are acquainted with the story of the 
future life of this Divine Child, think that we can 
read in the serious and almost exultant look, all the 
possibilities of the future. 

The mother holds the babe in her protecting 



62 



arms, while the child leans against her bosom con- 
fidingly, although his head is held erect as if he 
must keep wide awake for the work that is already 
planned for him. 

The mother's thoughts are concentrated. 1 think. 
on the child, although she looks out of the picture 
far beyond him. Perhaps she is looking into his 
future life, with a great mother love, dimly con- 
scious of the trial that will rend her heart as the 
mother of the dear baby, Jesus ; for she has heard 
through Simeon that on account of this child much 
suffering will be brought to the mother heart. There 
is on her face, however, a sense of happy mystery, 
as if her life has already proved a glorious experi- 
ence, and promises even more for the future than 
for the past. 

The child is like a young bird in its nest, and He 
leans against His mother with the assurance of a 
warm, soft, abiding place; but as He follows her 



gaze, there is a serious and even grand expression 
in His eyes. 

Both Mary and Jesus seem to be looking beyond 
the bounds of ordinary life. 

When all is said this picture presents to us a 
true likeness of Christ and his Mother as we con- 
ceive them. 

The work of the artist is done simply and in 
keeping with the two characters. He secures unity 
by means nf the nearness of the two figures, the po- 
sition of the arms, and most of all, by the straight- 
forward look of both in the same direction. The 
picture is serious, noble, and great in its very truth 
and simplicity. There is nothing superfluous, noth- 
ing that jars, nothing that indicates anything but 
self-forgetfulness on the part of each. "Both the 
Mother and the Boy seem to forget themselves in 
the thought of some great service to others." 




Shakespeare's conception of his characters is 
united with his conception of the dramatic action. 
His characters are full of life, depth, and truth, and 
their development is consistent. In "Macbeth" there- 
is a variety of character delineation, yet each char- 
ter stands out in bold relief because of Shakespeare's 
use of gradation, complement, and negation. 

Barrett Wendall says. "The means by which the 
characters of Macbeth and his Lady are expressed, 
indeed, would suggest doubt as to whether Shake- 
speare could have deliberately thought of them at 
all, except as concepts which he was bound to body 
in phrase." 

From a study of the characters, we see that Mac- 
beth is revealed to us through suggestion, through 
direct statements of himself and others, through his 
actions, and through implication. The first sugges- 



tion of Macbeth's character is given by the witches 

when they plan to meet Macbeth on the heath. 

And we are introduced to him through the report 

of the sergeant, who says : 

"For brave Macbeth — well he deserves that name — 

Disdaining Fortune, with his brandish'd Steele, 

Which smok'd with bloody execution. 

Like valour's minion carv'd out his passage 

Till he faced the slave ; 

Which ne'er shook hands, nor bade farewell to him, 

Till he unseam'd him from the nave to the chaps. 

And fixed his head upon our battlements." 

When Macbeth and Banquo meet the witches on 
the heath, we get an insight into Macbeth's charac- 
ter. Banquo directs our attention to the effect pro- 
duced on Macbeth by the witches: 

"Good sir, why do you start and seem to fear 

Things that do sound so fair?" 

Through Lady Macbeth's soliloquy after read- 
ing the letter from her husband, we see more deeply 
into Macbeth's life: 
"Thou wouldst be great. 
Art not without ambition, but without the illness 

should attend it : 
What thou wouldst highly, 

That wouldst thou holily ; wouldst not play false. 
And yet wouldst wronglv win." 



She also tells Macbeth. 

"Your face, my thane, is as a hook where men 

May read strange matters." 

In Act I Scene iv, through Macbeth's own words, 
we see the intense selfishness of the character, and 
from his first soliloquy, we see the moral cowardice 
of the man. But from Macbeth's actions we get 
the deeper meaning of his life. He is revealed also 
through implication. In Ross's report of the condi- 
tion of the country under the rules of Macbeth, he 
represents it as a place 

"Where nothing. 

But who knows nothing, is once seen to smile; 

Where sighs and groans and shrieks that rent the air 

Are made, not mark'd; where violent sorrow >eemv 

A modern ecstasy: the dead man's knell 

Is there scarce ask'd for who; and good men's lives 

Expire before the flowers in their caps, 

Dying or ere the} - sicken." 

Lady Macbeth is revealed almost entirely 
through statements of her own and through her in- 
fluence on others. In her famous prayer we see that 
she must have realized that she was a woman with 
a woman's weakness ; 
"Come, you spirits 

That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here. 
And fill me from the crown to the top full 



( If direst cruelty ! 

Come to my woman's breast 

And take my milk for gall, you muttering ministers. 
^Yherever in your sightless substances 
You wait on nature's mischief !" 

In the banquet scene we see from her relation to 
the guests that she is a woman of courtesv. The 
sleeping scene reveals her to us through direct state- 
ments i if her ( iwn : 
"The thane of Fife had a wife: where is she now? — 

What will these hands ne'er be clean? 
"Here's the smell of blood still : all the perfumes 

of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand. 
( )h. oh. oh." 

Her influence with Macbeth also reveals her 
character. She says : 

"Screw your courage to the sticking-place. 

And we'll not fail." 

Macbeth answers her plans, saying: 

"1 am settled, and bend up 

Each corporal agent to this terrible feat." 

The characters of Banquo and Macduff are in- 
troduced, in a large measure, at least, for the sake 
of character contrast with Macbeth. Banquo is 
revealed chiefly through statements of his own, but 
the statements of others also throw some light on 
his character. Duncan savs of him : 



66 



" Noble Banquo, 

Thou hast no less deserved nor must be known 

No less to have done so ." 

Banquo says on the night of the murder: 
"A heavy summons lies like lead upon me 
And yet I would not sleep. Merciful powers. 
Restrain in me the cursed thoughts that nature 
Gives way to in repose!" 

This passage has been interpreted in many ways, 
but there is certainly a revelation in it. 

Macduff is described through his statements, 
and, also, through implication. In answer to Mal- 
colm's 

"Let us seek out some desolate shade, and there 
Weep our sad bosoms empty." 

He says : 

"Let us rather 

Hold fast the mortal sword, and, like good men. 
Bestride our down-fallen birthdom." 

After learning of his great loss, the death of his 
wife and children, he cries: 
"But I must feel it as a man ; 
I cannot but remember such things were, 
That were most precious to me. — Did heaven look 
on, 



And would not take their part?" 
"My wife killed, too?" 

llis wild amazement at this fate shows that he 
has no conception of the depth of guilt to which. 
Macbeth has sunk, and also his own essential inno- 
cence appears in his despairing outer} - : 

"Sinful Macduff, 

The}' were all struck for thee! naught that I am. 
Not for their own demerits, but for mine. 
Fell slaughter on their souls." 

Malcolm's "Merciful Heavens!" is fraught with 
meaning and throws additional light on Macduff's 
character. Macduff begins to play in the story a 
prominent part just as Banquo drops out. Shake- 
speare thus keeps the characters apart by contrast. 
Banquo and Macduff make Macbeth appear even 
more wicked than he is. 

Dr. Johnson says of "Macbeth": "The play has 
no nice discriminations of characters." While the 
"grandeur of the dramatic combination" may some- 
what overshadow the individual characters, yet the 
personality of each character is distinct, and Shake- 
speare has made us feel this through direct state- 
ments, implications, influence of characters, and 
succestions. 



67 




Heredity, innate tendencies, environment, de- 
velopment, and dominant motive, are all prominent 
causes for the difference between Lady MacBeth's 
love for .Macbeth, and Nancy Lammeter's love for 
Godfrey Cass. Lady .Macbeth, we feel sure, in- 
herited a proud, imperious nature; Nancy, a quietly 
good disposition. As a consequence, heredity gave 
to each different tendencies. We can easily believe 
that Lady Macbeth from childhood up had always 
a wilful, high-strung temperament that never stayed 
within the bounds of the present, but was always 
reaching toward the future. Nancy, never knowing 
anything but obedience through her conscience to 
the Higher Power, held herself thorouehry sub- 



servient to the right in the present, it mattered not 
what suffering might come with it now- or in the 
future. Next, the atmosphere in which each lived 
was a powerful agency to firing about quite oppo- 
site results. Lady Macbeth lived in a country that 
was "almost afraid to know itself"; Nancy lived 
hardly in echoing distance of turmoil and strife; 
thus. Nancy had more time and opportunity for 
choosing the better way. They each developed into 
strong women, capable of the deepest feeling — love. 
Each, however, sought in her love quite a different 
thing from the other. Lady Macbeth craved for 
Macbeth worldly honors; Nancy sought for God- 
frey, happiness brought about through doing right. 
All of these things — heredity, temperament, en- 
vironment, development, and dominant motive in 
life, have to be taken into account when we consider 
the difference in the nature of the love of these 
women. Lady Macbeth stopped short of no under- 
taking that promised a rich harvest for Macbeth in 
this world ; Nancy, defying disappointment and suf- 
fering, would not let herself once stray from the 
straight and narrow way that leads to eternal life. 
"Lad}- Macbeth's love was great, but finite; Nancy's 
was greater, for it partook of the infinite." 



63 




Silas Marner was, when he reached his twenty- 
first year, a young man of "exemplar}' life and ar- 
dent faith," and a citizen of Lantern Yard, where he 
was highly thought of. He was not a cultured man, 
but he was "sane and honest." From his mother, 
he had inherited some acquaintance with medicinal 
herbs and their preparation — "a little store of 
knowledge which she had imparted to him as a sol- 
emn bequest." He was a pious, trusting, simple- 
minded linen weaver, a member of church and pray- 
er-meeting. He trusted implicitly in God and man 
until there came into his life a tragic moment which 
almost ruined him. 



Silas was maliciously charged with theft, and 
the lots cast by the church declared him guilty of 
the crime which was really committed by one he 
complete!}' trusted. Now he lost faith in God and 
man. In hopeless despair he left the scerfe of his 
disaster and migrated to Raveloe, ami here he he- 
came a recluse. "He hated the thought of the past ; 
there was nothing that called out his love and fel- 
lowship toward the strangers he had come among: 
ami the future was all dark — there was no unseen 
love that cared for him." He sought no man nor 
woman except when his need of supplies or his 
calling made it necessary, "lie invited no one to 
step across his door-sill, and he never strolled into 
the village." Thus he lived in frigid loneliness, in 
hopeless, brute despair, until a greed for gold sup- 
plied a ruling passion. The hoard of money took 
man's place, and he loved it as a human understand- 
ing friend. "He handled the coins, he counted 
them, till their form and color were like the satis- 
faction of a thirst to him." Beyond the money, he 
had no purpose. His life consisted of weaving and 
hoarding. Yet even in this staee, there was left 



69 



some affection in Silas, shown by the incident of 
his grief over breaking his earthenware pot. 

When, after fifteen years of hoarding, his money 
was stolen, Silas' soul was once more a vacuum, 
until a waif — a golden-haired child out of the un- 
known — was accidently cast upon his protection to 
rescue him from his wretched state. 

By this "golden-haired child" Silas was brought 
back to happiness and to the societv of his neigh- 
bors. He must have become a gentle, loving, pa- 
tient man to have reared her as he did. He loved 
her; she was his "all in all," the ?reat influence of 



his life. He became interested in home and tried to 
make it comfortable and pleasant: he once more at- 
tended church and mingled with his neighbors. By 
degrees he was transformed into a man such as God 
intended him to be. 

The long looked for visit to the site of Lantern 
Yard, with the realization that it was no more, com- 
pleted the change in Silas' life. At the close he thus 
voices the transforming power of love: "Since the 
time the child was sent to me and I've come to love 
her as myself, I've had light enough to trusten by; 
and now she says she'll never leave me. I think I 
shall trusten till I die." 




70 



Si/as Marner's Cottage 

on the Night of 

Dunstan Cass' 



From the outside, on this dark, misty night, the 
ray of light from Silas' cottage was very inviting. 
On entering, the warm glow of the tire threw into 
bold relief the sad neglect of the desolate abode. 

To the right of the hearth, stood the great square 
loom, the only article of furniure in the room that 
gave evidence of careful attention. Just back of 
the loom, was a small window, its shutters were 
now closed. Sand was sprinkled over the entire 
floor, but at the corner of the hearth near the stool 
of the loom, the sand was thicker than in any other 
place, and on close observation, the imprints of 
fingers might be seen. 

Near the center of the mantle, above the fire 
place, stood one of "Grandfather's" old clocks. The 



pendulum was still, and judging from the amount 
of dust which covered the clock, it might nut have 
swung for years. To the right of the clock, were 
three books, and the one under the bottom looked 
very much like a paper covered Bible. They, too, 
had the appearance of neglect. On the other end of 
the mantle, a half-burned candle stood in a rusty 
candlestick. 

A table was standing near the left of the tire 
place, on which were a few dishes, some had great 
cracks in them, others were chipped, and all showed 
the marks of time. In front of the table was a 
leather bottomed chair, while two others, very sim- 
ilar to it, were placed back against the wall. 

( )n the left of the room, a rude shelf had been 
built into the wall. A number of green bottles, with 
one earthen waterpot standing near the center, 
made up the articles of furniture here. 

To the right of the room, in the upper corner, 
Stood an old square bedstead with enormous posts. 
Behind the door, a ragged coat was hanging, and 
near the center of the bed, lay a neatly folded piece 
of linen ready to be carried to Airs. Osgood. 

These were the furnishings of Silas Marner's 
cottage — the place he called home for fifteen years. 



7i 




"That's no excuse whatever." 

"You are on your honor. Bring up your de- 
merits." 

"You understand the situation. I'm in an em- 
barrassing' position." 

"That's good. Do it again." 

"How much time did you put on it?" 

"Good morning;, dear." 



"Now just stop and think." 

"All of you in ?" 

"Everyone is expected to wear uniform." 

"Report to ray room, Miss — — 's down stairs.' 

"Evidently you haven't studied your lesson." 

"Did you do your best, dear?" 

"Stop that piano !" 

"That's too general. Be more definite." 

"You may put him down, little girls, as one of 
your great characters for life stud} - ." 

[Excitedly | "Was that our bell, girls?" 

"I have no callers on my floor after the lights 
wink." 

"Well— er." 

"By the way. girls." 

"For instance." 



72 




John was well on toward three years of age. His 
mother was dead; so he lived at "Rampa's," where 
he was disciplined, petted, and spoiled by his grand- 
parents, two aunts, and an uncle. 

John slept with his aunts week about. His 
greediness for stories often exhausted the acquired 
knowledge, as well as the creative powers, of his 
bedfellow. And so it was one night when he was 
sleeping with his Aunt Laura. 



"John, can't you go to sleep?" said she. 

"No, I can't get fixed ; tell me a tale." 

"Well. John, shall I tell you 'Little Red Riding 
Hood'?" 

"Please." 

At last, when the story reached the point where 
the wood-cutters rush in and exclaim, as they pound 
no the wolf with their clubs. "Take that, and that, 
and that! And old Sir Wolf is dead!" John, as 
usual, joined in the exclamation in his lustiest tone 
of voice. 

Aunt Laura, thus finding that this story only 
served to make him more wide awake and nervous, 
started off in a sleepy, drowsy voice on an im- 
promptu list of words with John repeating them 
after her. 

"Encey, mencev, pensey." crooned Aunt Laura. 

"Encey, mencev, pensey." repeated John sleepily. 

And so on they said till hers was the only voice 
to be heard. Bv this she knew that John was in 



73 



dreamland, — perhaps acting the part of one of the 
wood-cutters; for just as Aunt Laura's eyes were 
closing, she saw the shadow of John's little hand 
rush out from the cover, and she heard him exclaim, 
"'Take that, take that, and that!" 

The following night began another week, and 
John must sleep with Aunt Nell. Xow John and 
Aunt Xell always said the child prayer, "Xow 1 lay 
me," in a very solemn manner, kneeling by the bed. 



They had reached the part, "I pray Thee, Lord, 
my soul to t ." when John had to stop to cough. 

"Take," repeated Aunt Xell as a reminder to 
him of where he had left off. 

"Take that, ami that, and that, and old Sir "Wolf 
is dead!" finished John, and crawled up into his bed 
to sleep under the watchful care of the Lord whom 
he knew in name, but not in spirit. 




74 



Wanted 



Not Wanted 



To see the point. 

More liberty. 

Holidays. 

'Bus rides. 

More suspicious letters. 

Three hundred and seventy intellectual grasps 

Receptions. 

To understand the situation. 

Sleep. 

Significant rings. 

"Uncles" on Thanksgiving. 

Midnight feasts. 

"Boxes." 

Place to walk. 

Post cards. 

Private mail boxes. 

Midnight chases. 

Talents. 

"Pink scraps." 

The Presbyterian School for Boys. 

Business fore-sight. 



Intellectual dentistry. 

Calls to the office. 

Boston Baked Beans. 

Macaulay's Essays. 

Reference Work. 

"Assistance" on back work. 

Alarm clocks. 

Tappings at our chamber door. 

Embarrassing positions. 

Chemical explosions. 

Six o'clock whistle. 

The undistributed middle. 

Cold-water sprinkles. 



75 




It was on the twenty-fourth day of December 
that Margie, a little girl eight years of age, came 
into a jewelry store to spend ten pennies, which she 
clutched tightly in her hand. 

It was natural that the store should be crowded 
to the utmost on Christmas Eve. All classes of peo- 
ple were there, but the rich were present in great 
numbers. Many mothers were buying bountifully 
for their own children: but they were not thinking 
of other children like the frail child at their elbows, 
who held all her Christmas joy in a pink calico 
scrap. There were too man}' pleasures crowded 
into the holiday hours of these shoppers for them 
to think of any one outside of their own circle. 



In this gay crowd, there was a tall, thin-faced, 
broad-shouldered man dressed in black. His brown 
eyes had a far-away look, and his face stood out in 
striking contrast with its joyful surroundings. His 
iron grey hair accentuated this suggestion of sad- 
ness. He was watching Margie in her vain at- 
tempts to get near the counters. 

While waiting", however, Margie was not dis- 
couraged. She wandered about, attracted at first by 
a doll, then by a small stoye or piano. She encircled 
the room seyeral times without spending one of her 
pennies. There were two reasons why she did not 
part with her coins : one was that she got only an 
occasional look at the Christmas goods as the crowd 
surged backward and forward; the other was that 
the only time she succeeded in reaching the counter, 
she failed to gain the attention of the clerk, because 
she was so small and insignificant in appearance. 

Xow the grey-haired man noticed this small bit 
of a child ruthlessly pushed aside by the crowd. She 
attracted him because of her neatness and patience. 
She wore a dark blue calico dress freshly laundered. 
The only trimmings on the dress were the patches 
on each elbow and the one on the right hip. The 



76 



straight white hair was parted in the middle, plaited 
in one small plait, and tied at the end with a short 
piece of faded blue ribbon. The face was long, nar- 
row, and pale ; the searching blue eyes, however, 
relieved somewhat the pallid face. 

The grey-haired man, stooping down, said to 
Margie : "Be patient a little longer; in a few min- 
utes the crowd will go to the church to decorate for 
tomorrow." 

Sure enough the crowd soon thinned: and Mar- 
gie could see more easily anything she wished. She 
proceeded to select presents for her mother, father, 
five brothers and three sisters. She chose a knife for 
her father, and marbles, tops, and trains for her 
brothers. She could not decide what to get her 
mother and sisters. At last she selected a cup with 
"Love me" on it for her mother, and a silver ring 
for each of the sisters. 

While Margie was making her selections, the 
grey-haired man was watching her from the oppo- 
site end of the store. Finallv, he heard her trying 
to persuade a clerk to wrap up the articles as she 
pointed them out, and he also saw her hand the 



clerk a penny for each of them. 

"Why, child, you couldn't get one of these things 
with all the money you've got!" caught his ear. 

And then came Margie's reply, "I can get any- 
thing I want at the penny store for a penny, and 1 
don't see why i can't here, too." 

She could keep the tears back no longer: for 
those ten pennies represented several months of 
self-sacrificing. 

Margie was just leaving the store when the 
grey-haired man caught her gently by the arm and 
said. "Come, my child, and we shall see where the 
trouble lies. What is it you want?" 

Margie's face brightened as she again pointed 
out her selections. Together, they watched the 
varied gifts wrapped as before. 

"But," exclaimed Margie, "the clerk said I 
couldn't get these with my money?" As she spoke, 
she held up her ten pennies in the pink scrap. 

The stranger answered, "Just give him your 
money and street number and everything will be 
all right, for I am the one to say what the articles 
in this store are to cost." 



77 




"O, Edith, where arc yon going? To walk? 
Wait, and I'll go with you. Say, have you written 
your Christmas story?" 

"I can't say yet. 1 have one started, but it is a 
poor thing. Where do you think the climax ought 
to come? I put what 1 think is the climax at the he- 
ginning. I really can't remember where Miss Wells 
said have it come. I wish she would let us wait 
until after Christmas to hand our stories in, and I'd 
make something happen while I'm at home." 

This conversation took place between two prom- 
ising Sophomores of a Southern boarding school for 
girls. 



The same evening at supper, the girls at one of 
the tables were discussing spiritedly the same sub- 
ject, Christmas stories. 

.Mattie, another of the Sophomores, said to the 
whole table : 

"I know what I'll do, — write to Airs. Strickland 
to tell me one of her stories and that will help me 
think up one for myself. But if I do write to her, 
you all will laugh and plague me about Joe." with 
a teased laugh. 

"( )h, well, that's what you are wanting, Alattie, 
more than the story — news of Joe. As to my story, 
I have had three or four plots fixed in my mind, lint 
that's the trouble, they are so fixed that they won't 
move oft nor on. I wish .Miss Wells would let us 
wait until after Christmas for the stories, for I have 
so much to do that I don't have time to think of 
anything that ever happened. I feel sure that some 
tragic event will come off this Christmas wdiile I 
am at home. I'll go with anybody that will go and 
ask .Miss Wells to let us hand our stories in after we 
get back!" 

This length}-, but hurried speech came from a 
Senior. 



78 



The next day in the alphabetical line at mail- 
call an L said to an M: 

"Have you written your Christmas story?" 

"Yes, it's all ready to hand in." said M., a Junior, 
who had the conscious smile of never having' been 
behind time in anything. "But I really would 
change my story a little as to its theme, if 1 coul 1 
wait and hand it in after Christmas ; for my theme 
is, 'And a little child shall lead them,' and every one 
that I've heard mention her story has that same 
theme. And. too. I'm afraid I prolonged the death 
scene too far," she added. 

"Well, I think Miss Wells ought to know that 
we have a lot of things to do just before Christmas. 
I wish she would put off the stories. Papa remem- 
bers ever so many things that happened to him long 
ago at Christmas, and 1 certainly would take down 
with pen and ink every word that fell from his lips 
this Christmas. Oh. I'm so glad I'm going home!" 
And up the line the freshman moved to see if she 
had a letter from home. 

Things ran on in this unsatisfactory way for 
about a week. Xo one was found bold enough to 



carry the request to Miss Wells, the English 
teacher. She did hear, however, in some way, that 
the girls wished more time on their assigned work, 
and she kindly agreed to let them hand in their 
Christmas stories after the holidays. 

But alas for those who put off for tomorrow 
what should be done today ! 

( >n the morning before the girls were to go home 
the president remained after prayers to speak to the 
girls. There was no use to ask for attention — every- 
one was on the alert, for the president's talk was 
certain to be something about going home ; and 
going home meant getting that Christmas story 
without much thinking. 

"Young ladies," the voice began, "there are rive 
of your number in the infirmary sick with mumps. 
And while I regret very much to tell you what this 
necessitates, yet I believe you will recognize the 
wisdom of the decision. We have decided to give 
only two days Christmas, and there will be posi- 
tively no going home." 

Immediately following this speech, the tearful 
voices of three hundred girls moaned out : 

"Oh, that Christmas story! Oh!" 



79 



Grinds 



Lost in the cause of Chemistry — ( >ne white 
waist. If recovered by future A. G. I. S. experi- 
menters please return to M. McCord. 

Delia (to Aunt Sallie, who had been off to a wed- 
ding) — "Did you congratulate them. Aunt Sallie?" 

Aunt Sallie — "No, honey, de uz already dressed 
when I got dar." 

-Maude — "Sarah, what made you stop going to 
the Baptist church?" 

Sarah — "1 have decided to go to the Episcopal 
church because all my descendants were Episcopal- 
ians." 

January 14, 1907 — Lula (breathless with inter- 
est) "Oh, I've been down to the library reading all 
about Homer's election." 

.Mr. Moore (to his bookkeeping class) — "Young 
ladies, for your next lesson please read 'Franklin's 
Autobiography.' " 
" Daisy — "Who is the author, Mr. Moore?" 

Miss K (to history class) — Little girls, I had al 
way thought that I had a rasping voice, but this af- 



ternoon, strange to say, it seems to have a soothing 
effect on you. 

Bert — "I'm glad I don't have to travel with my 
mind, for if I did I'd certainlv be tired when night 



Ask Ettie Mae if she has read Scolfs "The Last 
of the Mohicans." 

Mary (at the close of prayer service) — "Let us 
repeat the Lord's Prayer in concert." 

(She begins) — The Lord is my shepherd, etc — ' 

< iirl — "Annie Seay's father came this afternoon." 
Miss S. — "You say Annie Seay swallowed a cane 
this afternoon?" 

(iirl — "Please tell me where you were born, and 
whether in the spring, summer, fall or winter." 

( )ther (iirl — "I was born at , but as to the 

time of the year, I do not know." 

Ask Alberta if she knows anything about "Abel, 
son of Noah." 



OHnds— Continued 



Teacher in Mathematics — "Have you been 
through Algebra?" 

Pupil — "Yes ma'am. But it was dark and I 
couldn't tell much about the place." 

A. R. — This paper was read on Franklin's Anni- 
versary. 

M. M. — No. Franklin's Anniversary was last 
year. 

To a New Pupil on Registering — "To wdiat de- 
nomination do you belong?" 

Xew Student — "I-I don't know what that 
means." 

S. — "Do you take free-hand sight singing?" 

Teacher — "Miss A., what is the meaning of the 
word biceps ?" 

Miss A. — "A biceps is a two-legged animal." 

A Girl Who Rooms in Xo. 114 — "Miss Laura, 
please buy me a pair of gloves." 
Miss Laura — "What number?" 
The Girl — "Number 114." 



Aunt Sallie — "Aint your name Lucile?" 
Lucile — "Yes — why ?" 

Aunt Sallie — "Well, why aint your sister Fanny, 
named Fannycile?" 

Miss H., who frequently referred to "Virginia" 
before the Preps, and who is incidentally interested 
in Latin authors — "Horace didn't say that." 

Prep. — "Did you meet him in Virginia?" 

Mary to Maggie — "Do you suppose the teacher 
would object to my writing on one of those sten- 
ographers?" 

Miss S. to G — "If I should measure the distance 
from here t<> Aldrich, according to the Metric Sys- 
tem, what would be my unit of measure." 

"Kiloliters." was the prompt reply. 

A Freshman, just beginning Algebra, having 
reached "Simultaneous Equations" was asked: 
"What is the subject of our lesson today?" 
"Stimulated Equations," one weak voice replied. 



S3 Vo^7o@cAo 5 



fttorttfi 










Members of Cabinet 



ELIZABETH BULLOCK President 

LILLIAN McVAY Vice-President 

DAISY DUNLAP Recording Secretary 

NEALIE NETTLES Corresponding Secretary 

MINNIE BEACH Treasurer 

LULA EDENS Chairman of Missionary Committee 

NELL CLEVELAND Chairman of Music Committee 

ALBERTA SCRUGGS Chairman of Prayer Meeting Committee 

FLORENCE PATTERSON Chairman of Social Committee 

THE W. Y C. A. HAS TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SIX MEMBERS 



85 



Mlpha Club 



Colors Purple and Gold 

Motto "For God and Our Country' 

Flower 



Officers 

MARY PETERS President 

ELIZABETH BULLOCK. Vice-President 

ETTIE MAE HATCHER Treasurer 

MINNIE BEECH Secretary 

FLORENCE PATTERSON Critic 

NANNIE DAVIS HISTORIAN 

Motive Members 

Beech, Minnie McClennon, Sadie 

Bulloch, Elizabeth McLennan, Irene 

Davis, Nannie McRee, Ida 

Davis, Ellen McVay, Lillian 

Hatcher, Ettie Mae Nettlks, Nealie 

Johnson, Pearl Patterson, Florence 

Lenoir, Lucy Peters, Mary 
HONORARY MEMBER— Miss Elizabeth Maude Haley 



Cast a Han Literary Society 



"Ad Astra per Aspera" 
Colors 



Yellow and White 



Officers 

NELL CLEVELAND President ELLA THOMAS Vice-President 

MINNIE BEECH Secretary ALBERTA SCRUGGS Treasurer 

LULA EDENS Critic 



Honorary Members 



Miss Sophia Fitts 

Miss Mae Harwell 



Miss Anne Kennedy 
Miss Lila McMahon 



Bentley, Mattie 

Bullock, Elizabeth 
Beech, Minnie 

Cleveland, Nell 
Crowe, Ione 

Dunlap, Daisy - 



Active Members 

Edens, Lula 

Farris, Eunora 

Garner, Mattie Estelle 
Jenkins, Willie 
Jones, Vesta 



McVay, Lillian 
Robinson, Alma 
Eosson, Fannie 

Scruggs, Alberta 
Thomas, Ella 
Vassar, Lucile 



89 



Julia St r ud wick Tutwiler Club 



Colors Red and White 



Flower . - 

. "Ad Astra Per Aspera' 



Carnation 



Officers 



PEARL JOHNSON President 

MARY McCORD Vice-President 

SARA DALE Secretary 



IMOGENE WALDROP Treasurer 

URSULA DELCHAMPS Critic 

BRICE MILLER Historian 



Miss Elizabeth Maude Haley 
Miss Sara Louise Callen 
Miss Sai.lie Jacqueline Hardaway 
Miss Mary Young 



Allison, Cora 

Coleman, Laurine 
Crawford, Mary 
Crawford, Sara 
Dale, Sara 

Delchamps, Ursula 
Garrett, Beulah 
Gordon, Bessie 



^Honorary Members 

Mrs. R. R. Ellison 

Miss Maude Elizabeth Hayes 

Miss Marion Hall 

Active Members 

Hare, Lila Mae 

Hatcher, Ettie Mae 
Johnson, Pearl 
Lenoir, Lucie 
Massey, Ella 

McCord, Mary 
Miller, Brice 

Neely, Margaret 



Miss Mary Goode Stallworth 
Miss Pearlee Wilson 
Miss Elizabeth Houston Winston 
Miss Minna Theresa Grote 



Nettles, Nealie 

Patterson, Florence 
Patton, Eola 
Siebald, Lida 
Shipp, Della 

Shiyers, Kathleen 

Vaughan, Elizabeth 
Waldrop, Imogene 



9' 





_^^k^^^l^_ 




j^)emma 


HART WILLARD 


CLUB (j^ 




The Emma "Hart Willard Club 



Motto "Evolution Necessary to Expression" 

Colors Blue and Gold 

Flower Pansy 

Officers 

DELLA SHIPP President 

NANNIE DAVIS Vice-President 

ELIZABETH VAUGHAN Secretary 

ELLEN DAVIS Critic 

MABEL MYERS Treasurer 

FLORENCE DIXON Historian 

CLYDE PIRIFOY Poet 

Members 

atkinson, llllie myers, mabel 

Crowe, Ione Posey, Lockie 

Davis, Ellen Purifoy, Clyde 

Davis, Nannie Reynolds, Lucy 

Delchamps, Ursula Robinson, Susie 

Dixon, Florence Shipp, Della 

Ennis, Clancy Thomas, Ella 

Holt, Re Thompkins, Lula 

Hudgens, Jewel Vaughan, Elizabeth 

Hutcheson, Annie Windham, Helen 



93 



The Schumann Society 



Motto ■ " Poco A Poco" 

Flower 

Colors 



Lilac and White 



Officers 

NELL CLEVELAND President 

SARA CRAWFORD VICE-PRESIDENT 

VESTA JONES Secretary 

LUCIE LENOIR Treasurer 

URSULA DELCHAMPS Critic 

BESSIE GORDON Historian 

KATE PATTERSON . . Chairman of Membership Committee 

LUCIE LENOIR Chairman of Program Committee 

HONORARY MEMBERS— Miss Edna Bush, Mrs. Walter P. McConnaughev, Miss Bessie McCary 

Active Members 



Cleveland, Nell 

Crawford, Sara 

Delchamps, Ursula 

Embry, Renfroe 



Garner, Mattie Estelle 
Gordon, Bessie 

Houser, Ethel 

Jones, Vesta 



Gardner, Ella Have 



Lenoir, Lcuie 



Lyman, Laura 

Patterson, Kate 

Rosson, Fannie 

Sellers, May 



Sellers, Sallie 



95 



St. Cecilia Music Club 



Colors Purple and White 

Rower Violet 

BRICE MILLER President 

SARA DALE Vice-President 

ANNIE HUTCHESON Secretary 

EDNA BARGE Treasurer 

KATHLEEN SHIVERS Critic 

Roll 

HONORARY MEMBERS— Miss Margaret Boardman, Miss Pearlee Wilson 



Barge, Edna 

Crump, Linola 
Dale, Sara 

Dowling, Bertie Mae 
Grey, Mabel 

Griffin, Olivia 
Hall, Virginia 
Hitt, Bessie 

Hudgens, Jewell 



Members 

Hurst, Josephine 
Hutcheson, Annie 
Lyon, Marguerite 

LlNDSEY, DONNELL 

Lindsey, Ruth 
Miller, Brice 
Patton, Eola 

Posey, Lockie 



Powell, Floride 
Sanders, Canna 
Sims, Laura 

Shivers, Kathleen 
Smith, Lilla 

Traylor, Annie Mae 
Thompkins, Lula 
Williams, Pearl 
Walker, Nonie 



97 



Mn Club 



!abv Blue and White 
Flower 



Forget- JIe-Not 



Officers 

EMMA LONG President 

BESSIE THOMAS Vice-President 

ROSALIE POOLE Secretary and Treasurer 

CLAUDE SANDERS . . Chairman of Refreshment Committee 



Miss Pinkston 

Mattie Bentlky 

Elizabeth Bullock 
Mary Cameron 

Elva Cunningham 
Leola Faulk 

Annie Holmes 
Emma Long 



Members 

Laura Lyman 
Rosalie Poole 
Mary Readus 

Maggie Rikard 

Claude Sanders 
Fannie Scogin 
Bessie Thomas 
Louise Thomas 



98 



Kolors 
Motto . 



Kandv Ko oki.no Klub 



Chockolate and Kream Flower. . Buttercup 

" Work hard and eat a plenty, have a good time and don't leave any " 




LAURA MAE BAKER Chief Kook ELLA MAYE GARDNER Kandy Maker 

MATTIE ESTELLE GARNER . . . . Author of Manners SUDIE CROOK Chief Eater 

CATE BULLOCK Egg Beater ELLA THOMAS Olive Fiend 



99 



School Girl Maxims 



Economy is never candy. 

A "nitch in time saves a fine. 

Order is Mrs. Babb's first law. 

Outline is the thief of time. 

An ounce of butter in a napkin is worth two in 
a dish. 

Beefsteak is like pebbles in the mouth. 

To eat is human ; to sleep divine. 

A lesson done is something won. 

A holiday is a pearl of great price. 

Alex and his bell wait for no girl. 

Give me marshmallows. or give me nuts. 



A penny lent is a penny spent. 

Speak twice before you shriek. 

A girl is known by the floor she sweeps. 

A ship without a rudder is like a girl without a 
lover. 

Dare to do right, for right will never die. 

A lamp that's sooty is a task forever. 

When teachers firmly say, "Thou must," the 
maiden sighs, "I can't." 

Good marks are more than coronets. 

It's the wrong road that offers no learning. 




Athletics 



Baby Basket Ball Team 



B. B. B. T., 

Little, little are we, 
Although we are small, 
We may beat them all. 

B. B. B. T. 



Colors -Baby Pink and White. 
Captain— Corrie Bess Hall. 
Sponsor— Miss Young. 

Maids of Honor — Miss Overall, Miss Lawhox, 
Miss McMahon. 



Anna Bush 

Conde Cunningham 
Blanche Hafner 
Corrie Hall 
Elma Oates 



Members 

Thomasine Palmer 
Jennie Scruggs 

Kathleen Tidmore 
Nonie Walker 

Pearl Williams 




103 



Champion Athletic Team 



Colois Crimson and White 

Bower. . . . 



Red Carnation 



Yell 

C. A. T. 's 

C. A. T. 's 

C. A. T. 's Are We! 

We'll Win! We'll Win! 

One, Two, Three! 



LUCY H. REYNOLDS Captain 

ELEANOR CARR Sponsor 

ELIZABETH H. WINSTON' 



Maid of Honor 



Members 

Seasley, Mae Hall, Jennie B. 

Plrifoy, Clyde Reynolds, Lucy H. 

Williams, Mvra Windham, Helen 




105 



Junior Athletic Club 



Colors Green and White 



Cheer 



Jac-a-bocker, Jac-a-bocker, 

Rip, bum, bah. 
Montevallo, Montevallo, 

Rah, rah, rah! 



Jac-a-bocker, Jac-a-bocker, 
Eight plus eleven. 

Juniors, Juniors, 
Nineteen seven. 



Sponsor— Miss Haley 
Maids of Honor— Miss FiTTS, Miss Grote, Miss Franklin, Miss Hardaway 



Members 



Beech, Minnie 

Bentley, Mattie 

Btllock, Elizabeth 
Deer, Ella 

Dunlap, Daisy 
Edens, Ldla 

Farris, Eunora 

Garner, Mattie Estelle 
Garrett, Beulah 
Haggard, Janie 



Jones, Vesta 
Massey, Ella 
McRee, Ida 

McVay, Lillian 

Patterson, Florence 
Posey, Lockie 
Seibold, Lyda 

Waldrop, Genie 
Willson, Mable 



107 



Tennis Club 



Garnet and White 

Rower Red Carnation 



Officers 



ELLA THOMAS 



President 

MARTHA RALLS Vice-President 

ELLA MAYE GARDNER Secretary and Treasurer 



Cheer 



Lick-a-re ! Lick-a-re ! 
Tennis we play, 

Montevallo, Montevallo, 
Rip ! Boom ! Ray ! 



Lick-a-re ! Lick-a-re ! 
The best we are, 

We're the tennis girls, 
Rah ! Rah ! Rah ' 



Members 



Laura Mae Baker 
Cate Bullock 
Sudie Crook 

Ella Maye Gardner 



Mattie Estelle Garner 
Mary Jo Patterson 
Martha Ralls 
Ella Thomas 



109 




" 



Professionals 



White and Black Emblem . . 

Yell 

Boom-a-lack, Boom-a-lack, 

Chi, Chi, Cbee, 
Professionals, Professionals, 

Fourteen Plus Three. 



Basket Ball 



Captain BRICE MILLER 



Sponsor MISS McMAHON 



Laura Mae Baker 
Cate Bullock 
Nell Cleveland 



Members 



Sudie Crook 
Sara Dale 
Renfro Embry 
Emma Gibson 
Josephine Hurst 
Ruth Lindsev 



Donnell Lindsev 
Emma Long 
Marguerite Lyon 
Brice Miller 
Kate Patterson 
Mary Jo Patterson 



Evelyn Pinkston 
Martha Ralls 
Ella Thomas 



We, the Senior Class of 1907, of the City of Montevallo, State of Alabama, hereby declare this in- 
strument to be our ICasi Mill anb Qlratatttrttt, and hereby revoke all former testamentary dispositions of our 
property heretofore made by us. 



IFirst— So the Jarulto of tltr A. (6. 31. g>. : 

To Mr. Moore, a laurel wreath for his loyalty to 
us as a Class. 

To Miss Tice, ten uniform caps. 

To Miss Stalhvorth, our elevated "plane" of 
thought. 

To Miss Young, three cheers for her trip abroad. 

To Mrs. Babb, all our future scientific discover- 
ies. 

To Miss Sanders, all the favors received from 
Mr. McMath. 

To Mr. Moore, all our unridden 'bus rides. 

To Miss Haley, all our past experiences. 

To Miss Franklin, a wish that she may have a 
daily long distance 'phone message. 

To Miss Winston, one year's subscription to the 
Weekly Advertiser. 

To Miss Allen, the hope that she may have a 
date for every Lyceum number. 

To Miss Boardman, the love of the Class. 

To Miss Wilson, a bunch of sweet peas. 

To Miss McCary, a 1910 style picture hat. 



grronu— QJo ilir ©fftrrrs nf tbr A. (£. 31. S>.: 

To Miss Laura, one of our number as a messen- 
ger in the interest of her long distance 'phone. 

To Mrs. Harris, a menu for Monday. 

To Miss Henderson, all our empty medicine bot- 
tles. 

To Dr. Kinson, all the "untaken" phosphate of 
soda. 

Shiro— So tbr (Stria of thf A. (6. 3). S>.: 

To Jennie Hall, Ettie Mae Hatcher's studious- 
ness. 

To Lucie Lenoir, a watch set thirty minutes 
ahead of time. 

To Sudie Crook, Sara Dale's beaut}-, that she 
ma}- have no further use for her almond cream. 

To Minnie Beech. Mary McCord's mantle, that 
she may have a double portion of the prophetic 
spirit. 

To Florence Dixon, Cora Allison's art of ques- 
tioning that in traveling she may gain more knowl- 
edge to impart. 



To Serena Lea, Bessie Gordon's giddy smiles, 

that she may practice them on whomsoever she will. 

To Daisy Dunlap, Brice Miller's soprani.) voice, 

that she may carry two parts in the Y. \V. C. A. 

choir. 

Alma Robinson's natural curi- 
be an original investigator in 



a wish that she max hav< 



To Lyda Seibolc 
osity, that she ma_\ 
Chemistry. 

To .Mary Peter; 
model kindergarten. 

To Pearl Johnson, a "box" and only one com- 
panion. 

To Alary Harrison, Xealie Nettles' spare mo- 
ments, so that she may have more time to spend 
with Lila McWilliams. 

To Ursula Delchamps, Nell Cleveland's physio- 
logical basis of apperception, that she may seize the 
"psychological moment." 

To Lilian McVay, Alberta Scruggs' "scootin' " 
around energy, that she may be able to get out of 
the way of chemistry explosions. 



To the Junior Class, our "realized" prosperity, 
undisturbed peace, and supreme happiness. 
(Signed) SENIOR CLASS. 

Per Nealie Nettles, Sec'v. 
Attested by : 

FLORENCE PATTERS! >N, 

President of Junior Class. 
Since looking over these bequests, in remem- 
brance of faithful service rendered by our dusky 
friends, we make the following codicil: 
To Aunt Rachel, a marble bread-board. 
To Robert, all our literary productions that 
made the acquaintance of the waste-basket. 

To George, a muffled-tone supper bell for the 
benefit of the Y. W. C. A. 

To John, a set of spring gate latches to keep 
out the cows. 

To Alex, all our chemistry aprons. 
To Ed, all our uneaten fried chicken. 
To Aunt Sallie. ten well-worn brooms. 
(Signed) SENIOR CLASS. 

Per Nealie Nettles. Sec'y. 







Through many trying times 
( )ur class will have to go, 

Bowed down beneath the cares 
Which now we do not know. 

Yet through the gloom we'll see 
The lessons great of truth 

Which we have learned while here 
To seek in earlv youth. 



The parting day is here, 

Farewells must now be said ; 

Soon we shall gather home, 

Bv that sweet thought we're led. 



May they not only be 
To us a guide to rest, 

But may they lead our friends 
To thee, A. G. I. S. 



To leave our school so dear. 
Our friends and teachers too, 

Fills every heart with grief 
As now we sav adieu. 



Although we say farewell, 

We'll e'er be joined in thought 

And one in purpose true 

To live what thou hast taught. 



113 



Lookino backward 



= A LAB A MA == 

GIRLS' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 




MONTEVALLO 
ALABAMA 



Rev. Francis M. Peterson, A. M., D. D. 

President 

James Alexander Moore, 

President, pro tempore 




Session begins Wednesday, September 11, 1907. Location high and healthful. Strong Pro- 
fessional and Technical Courses. Faculty of 30 Teachers. Session extended. Total Expenses, 
$103.00. For Catalogue, address the President, pro tempore 



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UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA 

OPENED 1831 

^^ 

JOHN W. ABERCROMBIE, LL. D. 
PRESIDENT 

TJORTY-FOUR officers of instruction and government. Regular enrollment for last session, 
491; summer school enrollment, 316; total, 807. Excellent library and laboratories. Well 
equipped gymnasium. Electric lights. Spring water. Good health. Athletics. 

Graduate and undergraduate courses in twelve academic schools, to-wit: Biology, 
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For Catalogue, address C. H. JONES, Secretary, University, Ala. 



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D. L WILKINSON, M. D. 

PHYS1CI/\N 

FOR 

ALABAMA 
GIRLS' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 






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OF MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 

DOES A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 



YOUR ACCOUNT IS SOLICITED § 



OFFICERS 

C. L. MERONEY President 

J. ALEX. MOORE Vice-President 

Wm. LYMAN Cashier Eh 

DIRECTORS 

D. L. WILKINSON J. H. McMATH C. L. MERONEY ,R 
Wm. LYMAN J. ALEX. MOORE R. E. WOOLLEY fp 



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Roberts & Son 

"THE BIG ALABAMA HOUSE" 

Engravers, Society Stationers, 
TR/NTERS 
"Blank Book Makers 
and Lithographers 

PRINTERS OF THIS 'BOOK 
STORE AND TLA NT 

1812 THIRD MVENUE 

"BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



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